Emergency preparedness: 10 items to have in your kit

What will you need if disaster strikes?

Emergency preparedness means planning ahead. Thanks to the Los Angeles County of Public Health, the checklist of items below makes it easy. Go over them with your family and review and update them once a year so they stay complete and up-to-date. Emergencies can happen at any time, and they often require families to look after their own needs for several days. When an emergency strikes, it’s too late to begin to plan how you and your family will cope with it, or to assemble the things you will need to survive. In the event of a major disaster, emergency services may be overwhelmed and will only to able to respond to life-threatening emergencies. If help takes hours, or even days to arrive, would your family be prepared to cope?

Preparing for an emergency before it strikes is your surest path to survival. One key step is to assemble an Emergency Supplies Kit. By gathering emergency supplies in advance, your family will be much more prepared for an evacuation or extended stay at home.

First things first.

Determine what type of container you’ll use to store your supplies. This will depend on how many people you are providing for. The container should be something that can be picked up or wheeled away in case of evacuation. Some examples include a large, covered trash container, a plastic storage container, or a backpack.Determine where you’ll store your kit. Store your kit in a convenient place known to all family members. Keep a smaller version of Emergency Supplies Kit in the truck of your car.


Emergency Supplies Kit Checklist

The essential items of a kit include at least a three-day supply of food and water for each person, first aid supplies, clothing and bedding, tools, and emergency supplies and special items.  Click below to download your emergency supply checklist:

Download Now

Review your kit every six months. Replace food and water and add necessary items as your family’s needs change.

1. Water

Three days to a week supply – one gallon per person and per pet per day. Remember your pets! Store one gallon of water per person (or pet) per day. Store water in plastic containers, such as soft drink bottles. Avoid using containers that may break, such as glass bottles.

2. Food

Three days to a week supply of non-perishable foods and a manual can opener. Remember your pets! Select foods that require no refrigeration, preparation or cooking and little or no water. Select food items that are compact and lightweight. Most importantly, select foods that you and your family like including ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits, and vegetables, canned juices, milk, soup, high energy foods, such as peanut butter, jelly, crackers, granola bars, trail mix, special food for infants, elderly persons, or persons on special diets, and comfort food, such as cookies, and candy.

3. Cash & Important Documents

(deeds, insurance, papers, medical cards, birth certificates, etc.)

4. Clothes

Sturdy shoes, and comfort item for each family member

5. Flashlight

and extra batteries

6. First Aid Kit

and manual

7. Medicine

Over-the-counter and prescription medications, and supplies (like syringes, “g-tube” supplies, etc.).

8. Radio

and extra batteries

9. Toiletries

(diapers, sanitary napkins, trash bags, toilet paper, and paper towels)

10. Tools

for medical equipment (like oxygen tank wrench), fire extinguisher, adjustable wrench, sturdy gloves and whistle


Protection Means Planning

The LA County Department of Health Services protects the public’s health during natural and intentional emergencies, such as a terrorism attack caused by the release of biological, chemical or radiological agents. But you need to do your part to protect yourself and your family during an emergency. Emergency preparedness means planning ahead. The checklists below make it easy. Go over them with your family and review and update them once a year so they stay complete and up-to-date. For a complete list of terrorism agents, go to www.labt.org

Protect yourself. Protect your family. Complete this action list and keep it nearby.

  • Create a Disaster Plan
  • Outline what to do, how to find each other, and how to communicate during different kinds of emergencies.
  • Name two places to meet: one right outside your home and another outside your neighborhood, such as a library, community center, or place of worship.
  • Make sure everyone knows the address and phone number of your second meeting place.
  • Know and practice all possible exit routes from your home and neighborhood.
  • Choose an out-of-state friend or relative that household members can call if separated during a disaster.
  • Make sure everyone’s needs are met, especially seniors, people with disabilities, non-English speakers, and pets/livestock.
  • Practice your plan with all household members and be sure they have a copy. J Check on the school emergency plan of any school-age children you may have.
  • Prepare Emergency Supplies

Keep your supplies in sturdy, easy-to-carry containers. Keep the larger one at home and put a smaller one in your car. Include:

  • Three-day supply of water: one gallon per person per day for drinking and cleaning.
  • Three-day supply of food, such as dried or canned foods and can opener. J Cash (at least $50-100 in small bills) and an ATM card. J Changes of clothes and shoes.
  • A blanket or sleeping bag for each person.
  • First aid kit.
  • Family’s prescribed medicines and, if possible, copies of prescriptions.
  • Battery-powered radio, flashlight, extra batteries, and waterproof matches.
  • Soap, toilet paper, and extra plastic bags.
  • Items for pets, infant, elderly, or disabled family members.
  • Extra eyeglasses, extra set of car and home keys.
  • Copy of important family papers in a fireproof container.
  • A whistle in case you are trapped.
  • If you must evacuate your home, please take your pets/livestock if possible. Include food, medicine and I.D. tag on the pet’s collar.

In the Unlikely Event of a bioterrorism emergency, review the following bioterrorism agent information. Bioterrorism occurs when substances that can cause illness or death are intentionally released, including:

  • Biological Agents: Bacteria, viruses, or other biological substances. Examples: anthrax, smallpox, plague, botulism.
  • Chemical Agents: Toxic gases, liquids, or solids that can harm people or the environment. Examples: sarin and ricin.
  • Radiological Weapons: Explosive devices that spread radioactive materials. Example: dirty bomb.

For a complete list of terrorism agents, go to www.labt.org

Personal Health and Emergency Information
Talk to your family about the health risks of different emergencies. Do a full accounting of family members’ medical needs and family health resources. Fill out the form below to get started. For more information, please visit www.lapublichealth.org/dis/pubs/displan.htm

Emergency Contact:
• Local
• Out of State
Family Doctor:
Local Hospital:
Local Police:
Local Fire:
School(s):
Meeting Location #1
Meeting Location #2
Health Insurance Carrier:
Other:

Family Member Blood Type Medical Record/ Policy Number
Past/Current Medical Conditions & Allergies
CONTACT
PHONE NUMBER
Current Medications

Other Resources

  • Los Angeles County Department of Health Services – Public Health: www.labt.org Hotline: 866-999-LABT (5228)
  • L.A. County Emergency Survival Program (ESP): www.espfocus.org
  • L.A. County Disaster Hotline: 800-980-4990
  • Info Line Los Angeles – “211 LA COUNTY”: 211
  • City of Los Angeles Emergency Operation Organization: www.lacity.org/epd Helpline: 888-356-4661
  • California Emergency Preparedness Office: www.dhs.ca.gov/ps/ddwem/environmental/epo/epoindex.htm
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: www.bt.cdc.gov Hotline: 888-246-2675
  • U.S. Department of Homeland Security: www.ready.gov
  • Poison Center Hotline: 800-222-1222
  • Red Cross disaster preparedness information in Arabic, Cambodian, Chinese, English, Farsi, French, Hmong, Japanese, Korean, Laotian, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog, Vietnamese: www.redcross.org/services/disaster/

Do Your Part! In the event of any emergency, help us by:

  • Keep 9-1-1 emergency phone lines open for true emergencies. J Use hospitals only for medical emergencies. Keep roads clear and stay home
  • Use flashlights instead of matches or electrical switches if you think there may be a gas leak.
  • unless you are advised to evacuate or have a medical emergency.

For More Information, contact 1-866-999-LABT (5228)
All information here is provided courtesy of the Department of Public Health. Click here to download your emergency preparedness checklist from the Department of Public Health.

Community based organization directory

Are you involved with a community based organization or faith based organization and interested in providing realignment services to the Probation or Sheriff department? You may view the County of Los Angeles’ Request for Proposals (RFP) from Probation or the Sheriff.  We are currently in the process of compiling a directory of faith based organizations and community based organizations. To apply to have your organization included by completing the form below and letting us know about the services you provide.

Rewards: Seeking justice for these murder victims

The Board of Supervisors of Los Angeles County offers cash rewards for information which leads to the apprehension or conviction of any person responsible for committing crimes which pose a risk to the well-being of the community. In order to claim a reward, you must (1) provide information to the law enforcement agency which leads to the apprehension and conviction of the party responsible for the crime and (2) submit a claim for a reward to the Executive Office of the Board of Supervisors. In order to receive payment for a reward, the person or persons responsible for the crime must be convicted of the crime, unless the Board of Supervisors makes a finding of impossibility of conviction due to the death or incapacity of the person.

 

 

Reestablish Reward Offer in Murder of Iyshun Dionte Tornero Bennett

On Tuesday, April 16, 2013, in front of 1734 West 151st Street in Compton, 23-year old Iyshun Dionte Tornero Bennett was with friends and family attending a birthday barbecue party. At approximately 11:52 p.m., an unknown assailant (or assailants) began shooting at the partygoers. Iyshun, along with a 15-year old male and 39-year old male, were struck by gunfire while standing in the front yard of the residence. Witnesses at the party observed that the gun shots emanated from an area located west of the party. Iyshun was transported to Harbor-UCLA Medical Center where he died from his injuries during surgery. The two remaining victims suffered non-life threatening injuries. However, the 39-year old male victim sustained significant injuries to his intestines and faces a prolonged recovery period.

Iyshun Bennett is described as a former star football player at Compton High School who was preparing to pursue a career as an x-ray technician. The shock and senselessness of this tragedy has left Iyshun’s family devastated.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (LASD) detectives believe that there are witnesses in the neighborhood that may have seen the suspects leave the area. The Board of Supervisors reestablished the reward offer in this case on September 9, 2014, however, the reward offer expired on February 6, 2015. With the reestablishment of this reward offer, any individuals with information about this senseless crime are urged to contact LASD’s Homicide Bureau or Crime Stoppers. Detectives believe that a reward offer would be helpful in solving this crime, thus bringing some sense of closure and justice to Iyshun Bennett’s family and friends.

I THEREFORE MOVE THAT THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS:

Reestablish the offer of a reward in the amount of $10,000 in exchange for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person(s) responsible for the death of 23-year old Iyshun Bennett and the injuries sustained by a 15-year old male and 39-year old male, who were struck by gunfire on April 16, 2013, in front of 1734 West 151st Street in Compton.

Detective Ralph Hernandez

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department
Homicide Bureau
(323) 890-5500

- or -

Crime Stoppers
(800) 222-8477

Establish Reward Offer in Murder of Tynisa Lagail Hicks
 

On June 7, 2014, at approximately 12:20 a.m., on the 1400 block of W. 104th Street located in unincorporated West Athens, 38-year old Tynisa Lagail Hicks was returning home after celebrating her husband’s birthday. She was walking towards her front door when a car stopped just east of the home. Tynisa saw three black males exit their vehicle. As Tynisa’s husband Anthony entered his home, Tynisa yelled a warning, and as multiple bullets began hitting the front of the house, Anthony dove atop of the children who were sleeping on the living room floor. Tynisa was shot as she blocked the door with her body and died protecting her family. The suspects fled in a dark sedan east-bound headed towards Normandie Avenue.

Tynisa worked in the medical billing field. She supported her children and monitored closely the special medical needs of her 16-year old son. She is survived by her husband and three children. Tynisa was a well-loved and respected mother, daughter, sister, neighbor, and friend.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (LASD) detectives believe that there are witnesses in the neighborhood that may have seen the suspects leave the area. Any individuals with information about this heinous crime are urged to contact the LASD’s Homicide Bureau or Crime Stoppers. Detectives believe that a reward offer would be helpful in solving this senseless crime, thus bringing some sense of closure and justice to Tynisa Hicks’ family and friends.

I THEREFORE MOVE THAT THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS:

Establish the offer of a reward in the amount of $10,000 in exchange for information leading to the apprehension and/or conviction of the person(s) responsible for the death of 38-year old Tynisa Lagail Hicks, who was fatally shot on June 7, 2014, in front of her home on the 1400 block of W. 104th Street located in unincorporated West Athens.

Sergeant Ken Perry
Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department
Homicide Bureau
(323) 890-5500

- or -

Crime Stoppers
(800) 222-8477

Establish Reward Offer in Murder of Mr. Calvin Eugene Gray

On Tuesday, July 29, 2014, 33-year old Calvin Eugene Gray was shot and killed at approximately 8:30 p.m. on the 1000 block of West 76th Street in the Vermont Knolls community in Los Angeles. Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) officers responded to the radio call about the shooting, and when they arrived, they found Mr. Gray in his vehicle suffering from gunshot wounds. Paramedics from the Los Angeles Fire Department responded and tragically, pronounced Mr. Gray deceased at the scene.

Mr. Gray was employed by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department as a Security Officer. He joined the Sheriff’s Department on October 14, 2010 and was assigned to the County Services Bureau at the time of his untimely murder. Mr. Gray was a valued member of the Sheriff’s Department and represented the County of Los Angeles to the highest professional standard while maintaining a strong moral conviction and compassion towards the public he served. Mr. Gray is survived by his three children and he leaves behind a large family comprised of multiple brothers and sisters and his 70-year old mother. In his off-hours, he was an active member of his community and church.

LAPD detectives believe that there are witnesses in the neighborhood that may have seen the suspect(s) leave the area. Any individuals with information about this senseless crime are urged to contact the LAPD’s Robbery-Homicide Division. Detectives believe that a reward offer would be helpful in solving this crime, thus bringing some sense of closure and justice to Mr. Gray’s family and friends.

I THEREFORE MOVE THAT THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS:

Establish the offer of a reward in the amount of $10,000 in exchange for information leading to the apprehension and/or conviction of the person(s) responsible for the murder of Mr. Calvin Eugene Gray, who was shot and killed on July 29, 2014 at approximately 8:30 pm. on the 1000 block of West 76th Street in the Vermont Knolls community in Los Angeles.

Detective Marcia
Detective Roberts
Los Angeles Police Department
Robbery Homicide Division
(213) 486-6890

- or -

Crime Stoppers
(800) 222-8477

Establish Reward Offer in Murder of Jason Kennedy

 

On July 31, 2013 at approximately 8:35 p.m., at the intersection of 108th Street and Western Avenue, 32-year old Jason Kennedy was shot and killed. Witnesses first observed a dark colored vehicle traveling south on Western Avenue and subsequently stop in the street. Several of the vehicle’s occupants then exited the vehicle and opened fire on several men who were walking on the sidewalk, including Jason, who was struck by the gunfire. The suspects then fled in their vehicle. The other individuals who were fired upon fled the scene and have not made themselves known to law enforcement.  It is unclear if Jason was target of the attack and law enforcement officials believe that he may have been an innocent passerby – a victim of mistaken identity.

Jason’s untimely death has been very difficult for his family, friends and the entire community.  Jason is described as a generous and kind young man who was known for helping people, especially his elders. He had a promising future in the construction business. Jason grew up in the area of this senseless crime and his house was just steps away from where the gunfire occurred.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (Sheriff) detectives believe that there are witnesses in the neighborhood that may have seen the suspects leave the area.  Any individuals with information about this heinous crime are urged to contact the Sheriff’s Homicide Bureau or Crime Stoppers.  Detectives believe that a reward offer would be helpful in solving this crime, thus bringing some sense of closure and justice to Jason Kennedy’s family and friends.

 

I THEREFORE MOVE THAT THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS:

Establish the offer of a reward in the amount of $10,000 in exchange for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person(s) responsible for the murder of 32-year old Jason Kennedy, who was shot and killed on July 31, 2013 at approximately 8:35 p.m., at the intersection of 108th Street and Western Avenue in the unincorporated area of Los Angeles County.

 

Detective Gary Sica
Sergeant Michael Rodriguez
Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department
Homicide Bureau
(323) 890-5000 or
(888) 412-7463

Establish Reward Offer in Murder of Tauruson McMillian

On January 4, 2014, at approximately 6:30 p.m., 34-year old Tauruson McMillian was driving north on Wilmington Avenue from Rosecrans Avenue, when he was struck in the head by gunfire which caused him to lose control of his vehicle. The vehicle crashed through a backyard fence surrounding the property on the 700 block of West 139th street in the City of Compton.  Mr. McMillian was pronounced dead at the scene.

Mr. McMillian’s untimely death has been very difficult for his family and friends. He is described as a hardworking family man who was employed by the City of Pasadena, he was not a resident of the City of Compton, and was in the area only to check on the welfare of his friend.  Law enforcement officials believe he was an innocent passerby mistaken as a gang member because of the color of his Chevrolet Monte Carlo.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (Sheriff) detectives believe there are witnesses in the neighborhood that may have seen the suspects leave the area.  Any individuals with information about this heinous crime are urged to contact the Sheriff’s Homicide Bureau or Crime Stoppers.  Detectives believe that a reward offer would be helpful in solving this crime, thus bringing some sense of closure and justice to Mr. McMillian’s family and friends.

I THEREFORE MOVE THAT THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS:

Establish the offer of a reward in the amount of $10,000 in exchange for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person(s) responsible for the murder of 34-year old Tauruson McMillian, who was shot and killed on January 4, 2014 at approximately 6:30 p.m., while driving north on Wilmington Avenue from Rosecrans Avenue.

 

Lieutenant John Corina
Sergeant Paul O’Brien
Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department
Homicide Bureau
(323) 890-5000 or
(888) 412-7463

Reward Offer in the Murder of John Wayne Whitmore

On June 13, 2014 at approximately 1:18 p.m., 65-year old John Wayne Whitmore was beaten while standing on a Blue Line train platform located on the 10000 block of Willowbrook Avenue, between Imperial Highway and Wilmington Avenue. Mr. Whitmore was standing on the rail line platform waiting for a train when two females approached him. A brief verbal argument ensued between Mr. Whitmore and the suspects, who then both began beating him with their fists and kicked him severely causing him to collapse. John sustained blunt force trauma to the head; he was transported to St. Francis Hospital where he succumbed to his injury a week later on June 20.

One suspect is described as an African American woman between 18-21 years of age, approximately 5’4” tall, and approximately 140 pounds, wearing a black hat, black t-shirt and long shorts. The second suspect, also an African American woman between 18-21 years of age, is approximately 5’6” tall, and 160 pounds, wearing white shorts and a white blouse. They both fled the platform on foot in an unknown direction. Mr. Whitmore is survived by a sister, two brothers and 13 nieces and nephews. He lived at his residence for 65 years and was a very talented artist. The investigators believe that a reward offer would be helpful in solving this senseless murder of pure malice, and bring closure to Mr. Whitmore’s family.

I THEREFORE MOVE THAT THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS:

Establish the offer of a reward in the amount of $10,000 in exchange for information leading to the apprehension and/or conviction of the person(s) responsible for the murder of 65-year old John Wayne Whitmore, who was beaten on June 13, 2014 at approximately 1:18 p.m., while standing on a Blue Line train platform located on the 10000 block of Willowbrook Avenue, between Imperial Highway and Wilmington Avenue, and succumbed to his injury on June 20, 2014.

Detective Margarita Barron
Detective Dameron Peyton
Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department
Homicide Bureau
(323) 890-5500

Reward Offer in the Murder of David Matthewis

On May 23, 2013 at approximately 11:25 a.m., 23-year old David Matthewis was shot while walking his bicycle eastbound along the south curb on the 1000 block of Elm Street in the City of Compton. David was returning home after escorting his girlfriend to her residence. A witness reported hearing one gunshot after which David was heard screaming for help. A dark smoke-gray colored boxy sports utility vehicle was seen driving eastbound on Elm Street and out of view. First responders from the Compton Fire Department rendered aid to David, and he was transported to St. Francis Hospital where he succumbed to his injury.

David is survived by his mother, stepfather, and sister. David and his family had recently moved from Long Beach to Compton. David had bright future ahead of him building custom bicycles. The investigators further believe that a reward offer would be helpful in solving this senseless crime, and bring closure to David’s family and friends.

I THEREFORE MOVE THAT THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS:

Establish the offer of a reward in the amount of $10,000 in exchange for information leading to the apprehension and/or conviction of the person(s) responsible for the murder of 23-year old David Matthewis, who was shot and killed on May 23, 2013 at approximately 11:25 a.m., while walking his bicycle eastbound along the south curb on the 1000 block of Elm Street in the City of Compton.

Detective Dan Morris
Sergeant Robert Gray
Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department
Homicide Bureau
(323) 890-5000

Cedric Hurd, an Offer of Reward to Find his Murderer(s) ($10,000)

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors approved a request to re-establish a reward offer of $10,000, in return for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person(s) responsible for the murder of Cedric Hurd.  Cedric was shot several times in front of his daughter’s home, located in the 10900 block of Hobart Boulevard in Los Angeles.  On December 18, 2001, at approximately 9:15 P.M., Cedric Hurd went to visit his 3-year old daughter, and was shot several times in front of his daughter’s home. The suspects are two black males, approximately 17 to 20 years of age (now approximately 27 to 30 years of age), and were last seen eastbound on West 109th Place in a large black sedan.  On Tuesday, August 1, 2006, the Board of Supervisors approved a reward offer of $5,000, which expired on April 22, 2008.  The reward offer was last extended on October 23, 2007, when the amount was increased to $10,000.  The Sheriff’s Detectives from the Homicide Bureau who are working on the case are requesting that the reward be re-established.

If you have information on this crime please contact the following detectives of the LASD Homicide Bureau:


Detective Scott Fines
Detective Gary Sica

Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department
Homicide Bureau
(323) 890-5543
(323) 890-5650
(888) 412-7463, (888) 41-CRIME) Anonymous Hotline Number

Ira Tyron Koger, an Offer of Reward to Find his Murder(s) ($10,000)

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisor has established a $10,000 reward offer in exchange for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person(s) responsible for the murder of Ira Tyrone Koger.  Tyrone who was shot on Thursday, February 25, 2010, in front of his home in the 800 block of West Beach Avenue in the City of Inglewood.   21-year old Tyrone was preparing to leave for work and was sitting inside his car in front of his home, when a car pulled up alongside his vehicle.  Ira was asked of his gang affiliation and one of the suspects shot Ira, who died at the scene from his injuries. The suspects are described as three male Hispanics with shaved heads and wore white t-shirts.  They fled in a stolen 4-door white Toyota Camry. Inglewood Police Department recovered the vehicle near Centinela Park on Florence and Centinela Avenues.

Ira graduated from Gardena High School in 2007, and at the time of his death, was employed at Los Angeles International Airport.  He was also an active member of The Silver Lining of Hope Crusade under the direction of Pastor E. Winford Bell.  He was a loving son, grandson, brother and father to his family, a wonderful friend and very engaged in his community.

Ira was not a gang member and, the shock and senseless murder of Ira has left his family devastated. He is survived by his mother, grandmother, fiancée, daughter, and sister who loved him dearly.

If you have information on this crime please contact the following detective of the Inglewood Police Department Homicide Bureau:

Detective Waters
Inglewood Police Department

Homicide Bureau
(310) 412-5246
(888) 412-7463, (888) 41-CRIME) Anonymous Hotline Number

Thomas Riley, an Offer of Reward to Find his Murder(s) ($10,000)

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors established an the offer of reward in the amount of $10,000 in exchange for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for the murder of 16-year old Thomas Riley.  He was shot and killed in front of a residence located on the 1700 block of West 105th Street in unincorporated Los Angeles.  At about 10:20 a.m., Thomas was standing in front of a residence, when two African-American male adults approached him on foot and one of the suspect(s) began firing a handgun in Riley’s direction.  Thomas and a second minor were struck by gunfire.  Both youth were transported to Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, General Hospital.  Thomas Riley died as a result of his gunshot wounds.


One of the suspects is described between 24 and 28 years of age, 6 feet tall, approximately 180 to 190 pounds.  A second suspect is described between 18 and 20 years of age, 5.8–5.9, approximately 180 to 190 pounds. The suspect(s) fled on foot towards Western Avenue after the shooting.


Thomas Riley was an upstanding young man of good moral character.  Riley was not affiliated with gang members, nor had he ever been in any legal trouble.  At the time of his untimely death, he was doing one of his favorite things — working with his friends on his mini-bike.  The shock and senseless murder of Riley has left his family devastated. He is survived by his father and mother.


If you have information on this crime please contact the following detectives of the LASD Homicide Bureau:


Detective McElderry
Detective Acebedo

Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department
Homicide Bureau
(323) 890-5500 or
(888) 412-7463, (888) 41-CRIME) Anonymous Hotline Number

Reward Offered in the Hit-and-Run Death of Aspiring Teacher

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors is offering a $10,000-reward in exchange for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person responsible for the hit-and-run incident that killed 26-year old Keith Conception of Los Angeles, an aspiring teacher.

On Friday, February 15, 2013, Conception was on the northbound 110 Harbor Freeway, south of Florence Avenue in Los Angeles County, at approximately 3:30 a.m. According to the California Highway Patrol, he had been in a minor traffic accident and exited his car when he was struck by another vehicle.

The investigation is ongoing and officials ask that any individuals with information contact Officer Christian Baldonado at (213) 744-2331.

Conception, who was born in Los Angeles, graduated from Jarvis Christian College in Hawkins, Texas in 2011 with a degree in social work. He had recently returned to Los Angeles and was working as an after school counselor in the city of Inglewood. He was in the final stages of getting a job as a teacher with the Los Angeles Unified School District.

“It is devastating to lose bright young men like Keith,” said Chairman Ridley-Thomas. “Our community lost a young man of great character and potential, and it is essential that we understand exactly what happened that night and see that justice is done.”

 

 

 

 

How to provide information:

  • Listed above are the crimes in the second district for which the Board of Supervisors is offering a reward.
  • Review the facts, if you believe you have information which could lead to the conviction of the criminal, contact the police agency or county department. The police or agency contact can be found by linking to the reward notice from the reward listing.
  • The police or county department must have received the information on the crime within 90 days of the reward offer, unless the time period has been extended by the Board of Supervisors.

How to file a claim:

  • Claims for a reward must be submitted in writing to the Executive Officer of the Board of Supervisors within 60 days after the expiration of the period to provide information, unless otherwise extended by the Board of Supervisors.
  • DO NOT WAIT UNTIL AN ARREST OR A CONVICTION TO SUBMIT A CLAIM! You will not be eligible for a reward if the period to submit a claim has expired.
  • Claims for rewards must be in writing and should provide sufficient information on how to contact the claimant.
  • A claim for a reward must state the information which led or will lead to the apprehension and conviction of the criminal.
  • Informants may remain anonymous and such claims may be submitted through a third party such as a police agency. Anonymous claims must provide a method of contact.
  • All information provided will be kept confidential.
  • Any claims for rewards must be filed with the Executive Officer of the Board of Supervisors, 500 West Temple Street, Room 383 Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration, Los Angeles, California 90012.

[VIDEO] Hundreds March Against Sex Trafficking

Chants of “Our children are not for sale!” echoed loudly along a stretch of Long Beach Boulevard as nearly 400 residents, members of church organizations, community activists and elected officials marched from Compton to Lynwood, ignoring a light evening drizzle to bring attention to the plight of children who are sexually trafficked.

“Every day, children as young as 12 are bought and sold by adult men,” said Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors Chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas, who organized the march. “We will shine a light on this despicable behavior. You, who come here days, nights, weekends to buy these girls, we see you. And we will bring changes throughout Los Angeles County and the state of California.”

[raw]The march, which began at Palmer Avenue in Compton and ended at Helen Keller Elementary School in Lynwood, was attended by State Senator Holly Mitchell, Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca, Compton Mayor Aja Brown, attorney and social justice advocate Sandra Fluke and other local officials as well as community residents. Marchers followed a 1.6-mile route that is often the site where “johns” and “pimps” buy and sell young victims. Seedy motels and some businesses along the corridor also contribute to this activity.

Human sex trafficking is a $32 billion dollar business increasingly run by gangs. The Federal Bureau of Investigation estimates that 100,000 children in the United States are sold for sex each year. In Los Angeles, it is estimated that as many as 3,000 children are trafficked.


Sheriff Baca pledged that his department would arrest the men who have sex with underage girls.

“These young girls are victims. Our strategy is not to put them in a prosecutorial place but to save them from those who should be prosecuted,” he said.

At the event, survivors moved the crowd by telling their stories and calling for action.

“As a child, I was bought and sold here on these streets,” said D’Lita Miller, who was kidnapped and raped at 11 and ultimately forced into the life of sexual exploitation. Miller, who is now an advocate for girls, with the organization Saving Innocence, urged the crowd to look at girls on the street with compassion and love.

“I stand here as a voice for the voiceless. These are not prostitutes. These are children of God. Stand up because they need you. All of you here are making a statement.”

Maria Suarez, with the National Council of Jewish Women, was purchased for $200 at the age of 15 and endured years of beatings and sexual exploitation, thanked the crowd.

“It is so beautiful to see everyone here,” she said. “We are human beings. We are not disposable. I encourage all of you to keep on fighting.”

Many residents said they turned out for the march after witnessing too many lewd acts committed by men with young victims in parked cars, or coming in and out of a row of seedy motels and the adjacent alleyways. Much of the activity occurs in front of the school or in the school parking lot when children are getting in and out of school.

The march even drew residents from Long Beach, who said that what happens on the stretch of boulevard in Compton and Lynwood can also affect their own community as well.

“We are neighbors,” said Carlos Valdez of the Coolidge Triangle community in Long Beach, noting that whenever law enforcement cracks down on the trafficking activity in Lynwood and Compton, it gets pushed into their neighborhood. “We know that this can be a cat and mouse game. So we like to get involved.”

Senator Mitchell pledged to the crowd that her first pieces of legislation in January would attack the issue of sex trafficking in California.

“If you are here tonight, that means you intend to do something about this travesty happening in our state and our country,” she said. “Thank you for making a public commitment to do the right thing for our children.”

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Reward Offer in Fatal Fourth of July Murder of Unique Russell

On Wednesday, July 4, 2012, in front of 1346 West 97th Street, 14-year old Unique Russell was with friends, family members, and neighbors attending an annual block party celebrating the 4th of July holiday. Unique frequently traveled to the unincorporated West Athens community to visit with family members, who are long time residents of the community. At approximately 10:20 p.m., Unique, along with her cousins, 12-year old Rekell Reeves and 25-year old Freddy Pickett, were struck by gunfire as they watched fireworks. Witnesses, who initially believed the gunfire to be the sound of fireworks, observed two individuals stand on the southeast corner of 97th Street and Normandie Avenue and fire several shots into a crowd that included Unique and her cousins. Unique was transported to Harbor-UCLA Medical Center where she died from her injuries. The two remaining victims suffered non-life threatening gunshot wounds to their legs and were subsequently released.

After striking the victims, the suspects fled the location on foot and traveled south on Normandie Avenue. The suspects are described as two black males, approximately 18 to 25 years of age. At the time of the shooting, one suspect was wearing a black-hooded sweatshirt while the other suspect was described as wearing a white t-shirt.

Unique Russell was a rising sophomore at Washington Preparatory High School and is described as an effervescent young woman who loved her family. The shock and senselessness of this tragedy has left Unique’s family and the West Athens community devastated.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (LASD) detectives believe that there are witnesses in the neighborhood that may have observed the suspects leave the area. Any individuals with information about this heinous crime are urged to contact the Sheriff’s Homicide Bureau or Crime Stoppers. Detectives believe that a reward offer would be helpful in solving this crime, thus bringing some sense of closure and justice to Unique Russell’s family and friends.

On July 10, 2012, the Board of Supervisors approved a reward of $10,000 in exchange for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the persons responsible for the death of 14-year old Unique Russell and the injuries sustained by 12-year old Rekell Reeves and 25-year old Freddy Pickett, who were struck by gunfire on July 4, 2012 in front of 1346 West 97th in unincorporated West Athens.

Contact: Sergeant K. Perry or Det. G. Sloan
Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department
Homicide Bureau
(323) 890-5500

Proposal To Reduce Recidivism Among LA County Probation Youth


Vowing to break America’s pipeline to prison for minority teens, Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas and Children’s Defense Fund President Marian Wright Edelman on Thursday announced a comprehensive proposal to prevent recidivism among Los Angeles County youths.

The analysis of “re-entry” in Los Angeles County – the process by which incarcerated youths leave custody and seek to establish themselves in society– examines the failures of the current system and proposes 10 steps for improvement.

Los Angeles County’s juvenile probation population is the largest in the nation, at 20,000. Nationwide one in three African American males born in 2001, and one out of six Latino males born that year are at risk of imprisonment, according to the Children’s Defense Fund.

“Incarceration is becoming the new American apartheid. And we are the world’s leading jailer. If we do not confront the cradle to prison pipeline, we’re going to lose the last 50 years of social and racial progress,” Edelman said. “Our nation is in less danger from a foreign threat than from the pervasive poverty and racial disparities and miseducation that are contributing to widespread illiteracy, neglect, and abuse. These great gaps leave children unprepared for productive work in a global economy. We must declare war on the largest gap between rich and poor in our nation’s history and on the growing pernicious childhood povertythat is robbing millions of children of hope for the future. It is far cheaper to educate than to incarcerate our children.”

Supervisor Ridley-Thomas, who commissioned the report, added, “we must move beyond the fatally flawed view that the futures of youths in custody are beyond repair. It is critical we invest in elevating the education and health of these teens. Making such a commitment may not keep all of them from a future behind bars; but failing to do so practically guarantees these young men –and increasingly women—will form a permanent inmate class.”

The 65-page report, “Juvenile Reentry in Los Angeles County: An Exploration of Strengths, Barriers and Policy Options,” was authored by Children’s Defense Fund Staffers Michelle Newell and Angelica Salazar.

Some key challenges highlighted by the study include:

  • One in five youths on probation in the Los Angeles Unified School District is identified as a special education student, double rate of the overall district enrollment;
  • Half of males in custody had received mental health treatment prior to incarceration;
  • An estimated 50% of males in Los Angeles County custody are involved in gangs.

When these youths leave custody, many are unprepared to become productive students or workers, contributing to frequent re-offenses. The study found the reentry process suffers from:

  • Faulty planning for the youth’s release, resulting in failure to promptly enroll in school or receive necessary medications or mental health treatment;
  • Shortage of adequate drug treatment, mental health care, school support and job training;
  • Insufficient gang intervention programs.

Ten recommendations are presented to better coordinate pre-release planning among various County departments such as Probation and Mental Health, expanding gang intervention programs.

The report also found the Probation Dept. must better enforce existing policies, from recordkeeping to ensuring probation officers complete their assigned tasks. In some cases, existing pilot programs, such as a pre-release assessment program now in two camps, may be expanded to improve re-entry throughout the system.

“This study gives us a road map to reform. Our probation system in Los Angeles County has descended into a one-way street to prison for too many youths. It’s time we make a U-turn to salvage the lives of these young men and women and save society the tremendous cost of supporting a prison-bound generation,” Ridley-Thomas said.

Los Angeles County Probation Facts:

Youths on probation: 20,000 Youths in custody: 2,000

Racial makeup of youths on probation:

Latino, 62% African American, 25% White, 9% Asian American, Native American, Other, 4%

Crime is down in Los Angeles County and the Second District

This will include:

• Five Sheriff Stations in SD2 with links to crime statistics for each station

  • Requires meeting with Sheriff crime analysts

 

 

Neighborhood Watch resource kit

Neighborhood Watch
Los Angeles County has had a tradition of isolation that creates and feeds crime. There is no better way to combat isolation, foster community, and crack down on crime than the creation of a Neighborhood Watch. Throughout the years, Neighborhood Watch has grown from an “extra eyes and ears” approach to an all encompassing crime prevention partnership. This proactive community-oriented endeavor now includes the active involvement of residents with their local law enforcement. It is one of the most effective and least costly ways to prevent crime while forging bonds among area residents.

Neighbors working together in cooperation with law enforcement makes the best crime fighting team around. Any community resident can join a Neighborhood Watch; young or old, single or married, renter or homeowner. Members can learn how to make their homes more secure, watch out for each other and the neighborhood, and report suspicious activities to the Sheriff’s Department. You can form a Neighborhood Watch group for any area: a street, mobile home park, apartment complex, marina, community recreation center, or park. Neighborhood Watch groups are not vigilantes. They are extra eyes and ears for reporting crime and helping neighbors. Neighborhood Watch builds pride and serves as a springboard for efforts that address community needs. Citizen involvement is essential to combat this social crisis.

Starting a Neighborhood Watch
Contact your local Sheriff’s station for assistance in training residents in home security and reporting crime. Select a block captain who will be responsible for organizing meetings and relaying information to group members. Encourage participation and commitment among residents and neighbors. Make a special effort to involve the elderly. If you are interested in becoming a block captain, call your local Sheriff’s station’s Crime Prevention Unit for additional information.

Suspicious Activities to look for

  • Someone screaming or shouting for help, or being forced into a vehicle
  • Someone looking into windows or parked cars
  • Property being taken out of closed businesses or houses where no one is at home
  • Vehicles cruising aimlessly
  • Someone spraying graffiti on buildings
  • Strangers sitting in a car, stopping to talk to kids
  • Abandoned vehicles, suspicious people, unusual noises
  • A sudden change in a neighbor’s routine: newspapers piling up; drapes drawn; mailbox overflowing with mail
Enhance your Community well-being
  • Organize regular meetings to discuss current issues such as: childcare for school age kids, drug abuse, gang activity, hate crimes, recreational activities for young people
  • Encourage the use of deadbolt locks, smoke alarms and other safety devices in homes and commercial buildings
  • Adopt a school or playground; start a block parent program
  • Form a disaster preparedness program for your neighborhood
Volunteers on Patrol (VOP)

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Civilian Volunteers are dedicated to providing excellent service through relationships that build trust, create a safe environment, and enhance the quality of life in our communities within a “Tradition of Service”. Members of VOP strive to be proud representatives of the community by being highly visible while on patrol. The primary objectives for the members shall be to prevent crime by mere presence, or identify public hazards. Members shall also act as the eyes and ears of the Sheriff’s Department by identifying suspicious activities, crimes in progress, or dangerous circumstances. The members shall not take action themselves, but shall notify the proper authorities for handling. The Volunteers On Patrol members accept their mission to serve the community with the enduring belief that in so doing, they will maintain the high level of safety, quality of life, and the beauty of the community that everyone is entitled.  For more information on requirements, click here.  Sign up now by clicking here.

Information is provided courtesy of Los Angeles County Sheriff Department.  For more information on Community / Law Enforcement Program, click here or call 323-526-5015 or email by clicking here.

 

Inferno takes two lives

One woman died and firefighters later recovered the remains of another person, from the aftermath of an arson blaze that took place Friday morning at 1026 East Vernon Avenue in South Los Angeles. The fire was reported at 5:51 AM on Friday, March 2, 2012, bringing the swift response of 67 Los Angeles Firefighters, who discovered well-entrenched flames throughout an abandoned and apparently secured 50′ x 50′ one-story residential-business conversion. Despite fire-induced physical compromise of the clearly vandalized wood-frame and stucco structure that included a basement, the report of one or more persons trapped inside led LAFD crews to relentlessly search the flame-filled premises, with firefighters quickly discovering, rescuing and providing care to a critically injured woman – who later died at an area hospital.

The fire was extinguished in just 32 minutes.

 

Despite credible reports that a second person seen earlier with the woman had fled prior to the Fire Department’s arrival, the LAFD immediately deployed a specially trained cadaver search dog and handler to scour remnants of the building, which was destroyed by the fast-moving fire.  Returning to the debris-filled scene in the two days that followed, neighborhood firefighters were able to uncover evidence of human remains on Sunday morning. They then devoted themselves to working alongside Coroner’s officials and Investigators in seeing that the victim was removed and handled with the utmost of dignity and respect. A positive identification of the deceased – to include their age and gender, as well as the precise cause, time and manner of their deaths will be determined by the County of Los Angeles Department of Coroner. LAFD Investigators, who enlisted the aid of an accelerant detecting canine, determined the fire to be a deliberate act. Monetary loss from the fire has yet to be tabulated.

No other injuries were reported.

Those with information regarding this double-fatality blaze are encouraged to contact the LAFD Arson/Counter-Terrorism Section directly at (213) 893-9800.

Article courtesy of the Los Angeles Fire Department.

Public safety facilities in the second district


Second Supervisorial District


Sheriff Stations

Carson Station
Captain Bernice Abrams
Acting Captain, Lt. Eddie Rivero
21356 S. Avalon Blvd.
Carson 90745
Business Phone: 310-830-1123

Century Station
Captain Joseph M. Gooden
11703 S. Alameda Street
Lynwood, 90262
Business Phone: (323)568-4800

Compton Station
Captain Diane E. Walker
301 S. Willowbrook Ave.
Compton, 90221
Business Phone: (310) 605-6500

Marina Del Rey Station
Captain Oceal Victory
13851 Fiji Way
Marina Del Rey  90292
Business Phone: 310-482-6000

South Los Angeles Station
Captain Matt Dendo
1310 W. Imperial Avenue
Los Angeles, 90044
Business Phone: (323) 820-6700


Probation Department Field Offices

Centinela Area Office
La Carla Williams, Director
1330 W. Imperial Highway
Los Angeles, CA 90044
Tel: (323) 241-5800

Crenshaw Area Office
Deborah Weathersby, Director
3606 W Exposition Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90016
Tel: (323) 298-3511

Firestone Area Office
Mark Garcia, Director
8526 S. Grape St.
Los Angeles, CA 90001
Tel: (323) 586-6469

Compton Area Office
200 W. Compton Bl., Suite 300
Compton, CA 90220
Tel (310) 603-7311


Adult Day Reporting Center


Adult Day Reporting Center
Kathy New, Director
5811 S. San Pedro Street
Los Angeles, CA 90011
Office Reception
Tel: (323) 235- 7047


Realignment HUBs

Realignment HUB
Adult Day Reporting Center
Kimberly Tillman, Supervisor
5811 S. San Pedro Street
Los Angeles, CA 90011
Tel: (323) 235-7047

Lynwood Regional Justice Center
Realignment HUB
Kimberly Tillman, Supervisor
11701 Alameda Street
Lynwood, CA 90262
Tel: (323) 357-5545