Undesign the Redline

Undesign the Redline exhibit kickoff reception. Left to Right: Supervisor Ridley-Thomas, Undesign the Redline Consultant Mary Lee, Designing the WE Co-Founder Braden Cooks, and Enterprise Community Partners VP Jacqueline Waggoner. Photo by Leroy Hamilton courtesy of Enterprise Community Partners

A new interactive exhibit traces the history of housing discrimination across Los Angeles and the United States.  Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas joined Enterprise Community Partners (Enterprise), Los Angeles Trade Tech College (LATTC), Designing the WE and Wells Fargo to present Undesign the Redline.

Supervisor Ridley-Thomas shares lessons learned from Undesign the Redline. Photo by Martin Zamora / Board of Supervisors

“It is incumbent upon us all to approach the errors of our past with a lens toward a brighter future,” said Supervisor Ridley-Thomas. “This exhibit ‎helps us imagine what our community can look like. It motivates us to pursue bold change to implement our collective vision.”

Created by social impact firm Designing the WE in partnership with Enterprise, the interactive exhibit uses narratives, maps and other documents to trace how government policy, known as “redlining,” created racial segregation and disinvestment in communities from the 1930s to present-day. The exhibit combines historical artifacts, storytelling, photographs and activities to illustrate redlining’s roots and lasting repercussions.

Redlining has limited people from housing opportunities and their associated benefits, including the choice of where to live, whether to rent or own, and wealth generated by homeownership. Today, the growing threat of displacement caused by increasing housing instability is impacting these same neighborhoods.

Dance to kickoff the new exhibit.  Photo by Martin Zamora / Board of Supervisors

Undesign the Redline puts into perspective the local community landscape and the history of Los Angeles, including the stories of:

• The history of Watts as a visionary plan as a “free city” of blacks and other disenfranchised groups;
• Bunker Hill Redevelopment and urban renewal;
• Limited Diversity in Lakewood;
• The Federation of the High Cost of Living, which was formed to explore how rental costs could be lowered.

“Undesign the Redline sheds light on how the explicitly discriminatory housing practices of redlining continues to influence the design and growth patterns of Los Angeles today. But learning this history inspires us to change that legacy and encourages us to transform our communities,” said Jacqueline Waggoner, VP and Southern California market leader, Enterprise.

The exhibit is now on display at LATTC’s Magnolia Hall until March 31, 2019.