Undesign the Redline

Undesign the Redline, an interactive exhibition that traces the history and legacy of housing discrimination and segregation across Los Angeles and the United States, will be on display in April at the Los Angeles County Hall of Administration to commemorate Fair Housing Month.

Created by the social impact firm Designing the We, the interactive exhibition traces how government policy going back to the 1930s, known as “redlining,” created racial segregation and disinvestment that, in some communities, persist to this day. The exhibition uses powerful narratives of people and communities, maps, historical artifacts, storytelling, photographs and activities to illustrate redlining’s roots and lasting repercussions.

Enterprise Community Partners and Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas partnered with Designing the We to bring the interactive exhibition to the seat of Los Angeles County government.

Supervisor Ridley-Thomas said, “I encourage all to come and experience the exhibit, as we must know our history in order to avoid repeating it. It was not until 1968, with the passage of the Civil Rights Act, that the right to equal housing opportunities was guaranteed. As we grapple with this region’s housing crisis, this exhibition informs us of the historical impact of housing discrimination, especially redlining, that took place in all corners of our nation, including Los Angeles.”

Undesign the Redline puts into perspective the local community landscape and the history of Los Angeles, including the stories of:

  • The history of Watts as a visionary plan as a “free city” of blacks and other disenfranchised groups
  • Loren Miller & the fight against deed discrimination
  • The Federation of the High Cost of Living, which was formed to explore how rental costs could be lowered
  • The mothers of East Los Angeles
  • Bunker Hill redevelopment and urban renewal

“Undesign the Redline sheds light on how the explicitly discriminatory housing practices of redlining continues to influence the design and growth patterns of Los Angeles today. The relics of these practices are present in the form of displacement, gentrification and a vast homelessness crisis. Learning this history inspires us to change that legacy and advance a path forward that will transform our communities,” said Jacqueline Waggoner, VP and Southern California market leader, Enterprise.

The Los Angeles County Hall of Administration is located at  500 W. Temple St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. The exhibit is located in the Second Floor Atrium, Grand Park Entrance, and is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.