Cutting-Edge Data Center Saves Millions

Board of Supervisors Chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas speaks at the unveiling of DataCenter1 in El Segundo. Photo by Diandra Jay / Board of Supervisors

Breaking new ground in the digital age, Los Angeles County unveiled Data Center One, modernizing its information technology infrastructure while saving taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars. 

Located in El Segundo, the privately leased facility dubbed “DC1” will replace the County’s 49 data centers and provide greater security and efficiency for millions of documents and transactions, from health assessments to online book catalogue visits to pet adoptions.

Consolidating dozens of scattered data centers into a single facility operated by T5 Data Centers frees up to 67,000 square feet of space while expanding the County’s capacity to support 603 databases, store approximately 33 million documents, and process 83 million transactions per month. DC1 also has state-of-the-art energy efficiency features and enables fast access to new technologies and sophisticated data analysis tools to empower faster resource allocation, smarter decision-making and more efficient operations.

“We are on the path to modernizing countywide information technology, and we are doing it in a cutting-edge, cost effective and energy efficient way,” Board of Supervisors Chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas said as he cut the ribbon during the grand opening ceremony. “It’s the pinnacle of what public-private partnership should be.”

 “This facility will save the County hundreds of millions of dollars,” he added. “That means more dollars available to provide LA County residents with the goods and services they really need. Whether it is fighting homelessness, promoting child protection, or a variety of other initiatives, those resources will be put to better use.”

Chairman Ridley-Thomas co-authored the motion directing the County’s chief executive officer, chief information officer and Internal Services director to merge the County’s 49 data centers and consolidate the technology infrastructure of the County’s 37 departments into a single facility. The goal was to reduce the cost of hardware, software and operations; shift to more efficient computing platforms; use less energy and real estate; and boost cybersecurity.

Leasing the DC1 costs $2 million a year – far less expensive than the 58,000-square foot data center that the County’s previous CEO originally recommended building for over $200 million, not including power, cooling and operational expenses. Concerned that the original proposal was too expensive, oversized, and likely to become obsolete, Chair Ridley-Thomas asked the Board to consult an independent expert. Gartner Inc.’s analysis concluded that leasing no more than 10,000 square feet of space would be more efficient, both operationally and fiscally.

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