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Fighting Against Repeal of the Affordable Care Act

Board of Supervisors Chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas and several members of the board denounced a Trump Administration-backed Senate Republican bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act, warning it could strip more than one million Los Angeles County residents of their health insurance with devastating results.

Mounting opposition – including within the U.S. Capitol – has already prompted Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell to delay a vote on the proposed legislation.

“We will not retreat. We will not relent. We will fight for the people of this County because healthcare is a right, not a privilege,” Board Chairman Ridley-Thomas said.

image6“This nation can do more for the uninsured. It is unconscionable to do less,” he added. “This bill would hurt the residents of our County by assaulting our safety net. Therefore, we have to do what is right as people of conscience and as people of purpose.”

Supervisor Sheila Kuehl, who led a press conference to oppose the Senate Republican bill, said, “The slogan for the proposed plan may as well be ‘Make America Sick Again.’”

“LA County will be especially hard hit, because during the Medicaid expansion, we pushed hard to enroll men and women who had previously been uninsured,” Supervisor Kuehl added. “We cut the rate of uninsured in the County by nearly 50 percent. If this terrible plan passes, Medicaid, as we know it, will be virtually gutted and LA County will be ground zero for the plan’s deadly consequences.”

Supervisors Hilda Solis and Janice Hahn also spoke out against the Senate Republican bill, as did LA County’s Health Agency director, Dr. Mitch Katz; Public Health director, Dr. Barbara Ferrer, and Mental Health Director, Dr. Jonathan Sherin.

image2Dr. Katz warned, “About 1.2 million people in LA County gained Medi-Cal coverage via the ACA, and the ACA brought the County’s Department of Health Services about $560 million of new revenue, which allowed us to expand the outpatient delivery system and modernize our infrastructure. The Senate Republican bill risks all these gains.”

The health officials also estimated 323,000 people in LA County could lose the subsidy that has enabled them to pay for their health insurance. Over the next several years, an estimated 4 million people, or nearly 40 percent of LA County residents – including 1.1 million children under age 19 – would be at risk of losing their health insurance and/or will have much greater difficulty accessing vital health care services.

A Congressional Budget Office analysis found the Senate Republican bill would result in 22 million more people nationwide that would be uninsured 10 years from now.

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The Force is On Its Way to Exposition Park

(Left to Right) Melody Hobson, Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors Chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas, George Lucas Martin Zamora / Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors

(Left to Right) Mellody Hobson, Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, George Lucas
Photo by Martin Zamora / Board of Supervisors

The force is with Los Angeles as the Lucas Museum for Narrative Art moves one step closer to making a $1.5 billion dream a reality.  The City Council voted unanimously to approve an environmental study allowing the museum’s construction to begin.

Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors Chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas joined city leaders and young children from the EXPO Center on the  on the steps of City Hall to greet George Lucas and his wife Mellody Hobson.

“The Lucas Museum of Narrative Art is a natural addition to the Exposition Park, the historical center of education, culture and sports for Los Angeles County,” said Chairman Ridley-Thomas.

The Lucas Museum of Narrative Art will be a one-of-a-kind gathering place to experience art and exhibitions dedicated to the power of storytelling across all media, including paintings, illustrations and moving images. The Lucas family will fully fund the Museum’s $1.2 billion construction, collection, and operating endowment with no cost to taxpayers to build the Museum.

_5MZ0590“The goal of the museum is to inspire people to think outside of the box and help build on the myths that hold our communities together,” said George Lucas.

The new museum is expected to create more than 3,660 construction-related jobs and more than 400 full-time jobs related to the operation of the Museum.  The construction jobs will pay family-supporting wages for local residents due to the Project Labor Agreement with the construction unions. The Museum will be located in Exposition Park along Vermont Boulevard bordering Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard and Jessie Brewer Park transforming 11 acres of asphalt into public green park and garden space with the Museum hovering above.

“There’s no better place than Los Angeles,” said Mellody Hobson. “We have world-class neighbors and world-class institutions in Exposition Park.”

The Museum will be located in the heart of the South Los Angeles surrounded by more than 100 K-12 schools. The Museum will feature public lectures and classes for all ages, hands-on workshops, after-school programs and camps, and a wide variety of additional educational opportunities.

Acting on a motion by Supervisor Ridley-Thomas, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors unanimously voted last November to issue a resolution declaring Exposition Park as the ideal location for the Lucas Museum.

The Museum is expected to break ground as early as this year and open its doors in 2021.

 

 

 

 

Women Olympians Honored at Coliseum

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Posing with new plaques at the Coliseum in honor of two outstanding women Olympians. All photos by Diandra Jay/Board of Supervisors 

The images of two pioneering women Olympians have been enshrined on plaques at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum’s Court of Honor. Joan Benoit Samuelson, winner of the first women’s Olympic Marathon, and Anita L. DeFrantz, Olympic medalist for rowing and International Olympic Committee member, are only the second and third individual women athletes since 1932 to be memorialized this way.

“The Coliseum Court of Honor welcomes two extraordinary athletes who exemplify the Olympic spirit and paved the way for women to excel in sports at the highest level,” Board of Supervisors Chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas during the ceremony, co-sponsored by his office. “We celebrate Joan Benoit Samuelson and Anita DeFrantz for their achievements as Olympians and as female role models.”

Pioneering Olympians Anita DeFrantz and Joan Benoit Samuelson are honored at the ceremony

Pioneering Olympians Anita DeFrantz and Joan Benoit Samuelson are honored at the ceremony

 

After unveiling the plaque, DeFrantz said, “We all know that women’s sport historically has been underreported. I’m thrilled that women’s accomplishments will be celebrated at the Coliseum with these plaques.”

Nearly 60 plaques have been installed at the Court of Honor since 1932. Until now, the only individual female athlete commemorated was Babe Didrikson, and her plaque was installed in 1961. LA84 Foundation President and CEO Renata Simril led the effort to bestow similar honors on both Samuelson and DeFrantz.

“Joan Benoit Samuelson and Anita DeFrantz showed girls across the world how a sporting dream can spring into reality, and inspire our work every day to keep closing the gender gap in sports,” Simril said, adding the pioneering athletes’ contributions on and off the field are “nothing short of transcendent.”

Diandra Jay/Board of SupervisorsWith the goal of leveling the playing field so that sport is accessible to all children, LA84 supports thousands of Southern California youth sports organizations through grant making, while also training coaches, commissioning research, convening conferences and acting as a national thought leader on important youth sports issues.

Anita DeFrantz is a 1976 Olympic rowing bronze medalist and 1980 U.S. Olympic Team member.  She later became vice president of the Olympic Village for the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee, and a president of the LA84 Foundation. Currently, she is a member of four IOC commissions – Finances, Legal Affairs, Olympic Channel and the Coordination for the Tokyo 2020 Games. She is one of Chairman Ridley-Thomas’ appointees to the Women & Girls Initiative’s Governing Council, representing Los Angeles County’s Second District.

Joan Benoit Samuelson became the first woman to win the inaugural Women’s Olympic Marathon at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in 1984. In 2009 she was inducted into the Olympic Hall of Fame. Currently, she serves as a consultant to Nike and as a clinician.

Diandra Jay/Board of Supervisors

Supervisors Approve $1 Billion Plan to Fight Homelessness

On the heels of an unprecedented commitment to a public planning process, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a wide-ranging set of recommendations to put voter-approved Measure H funds to work for the county’s homeless citizens.

Photo by Bryan Chan / Board of Supervisors

Photo by Bryan Chan / Board of Supervisors

“Today is another historic day in the County of LA that highlights the energy and community collaboration being invested into the question of homelessness,” said Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors Chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas.

A 50-member planning group composed of individuals from diverse backgrounds convened to develop funding recommendations for the first three years of Measure H revenue. After five public meetings, the planning group, composed of County government staff, as well as formerly homeless individuals, technical experts, nonprofit service providers, and leaders of the faith, business and philanthropic communities reached a consensus.

Over sixty organizations signed a letter to the Board of Supervisors in support of the open planning process and next step to allocate funding to homeless services. Implementing those recommendations will begin in earnest during the new fiscal year, which begins July 1. Core strategies include:
· Sending outreach and engagement teams to reach the homeless on every street corner;
· Providing permanent housing with healthcare and other services;
· Expanding rapid rehousing for the newly homeless;
· Enhancing the emergency shelter system, including for those leavings jails and hospitals; and
· Strengthening the network of community nonprofits already serving homeless single adults, families and youth.recommendations

This landmark funding plan commits nearly $259 million to combat homelessness in the next fiscal year—and tentatively earmarks more than $1 billion to the effort over the next three fiscal years.

In its first five years, Measure H aims to help 45,000 families and individuals escape homelessness and to enable 30,000 others to stay housed. The ¼-cent sales tax was approved by 69.34% of County voters in March 2017. The expanded funding comes as the latest Homeless Count found a 23% increase in homelessness in L.A. County over the past year, now nearly 58,000—underscoring the urgency of the crisis and need for action.

“The data is daunting, but we’re prepared. We have a plan. We’re motivated. And we’re moving forward on time to deliver services that our most vulnerable homeless residents need and deserve,” said Chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas.

Photo by Bryan Chan / Board of Supervisors

Photo by Bryan Chan / Board of Supervisors

Chairman Ridley-Thomas introduced a unanimously approved motion to closely track data and measure progress on measure H goals every six months. To that end, a five-member Citizens’ Oversight Advisory Board will also be reviewing expenditures twice a year and publishing an annual accounting.

For more information on the County’s groundbreaking Homeless Initiative, go to http://homeless.lacounty.gov/.

Stellar Credit Ratings Lead to Millions in Taxpayer Savings

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Saving taxpayers millions of dollars in interest payments, Los Angeles County achieved its highest long-term credit ratings in a decade, thanks to an upgrade by Moody’s this week.

Moody’s joined Fitch and S&P, the Big Three credit rating agencies, in deeming the County to be very creditworthy and unlikely to default on its financial obligations. In upgrading the County’s rating from Aa2 to Aa1, Moody’s cited its “strong and stable financial position” and “strong management team that has positioned the County well to address ongoing challenges,” among other factors.

Treasurer and Tax Collector Joseph Kelly estimates every upgrade in the County’s long-term credit rating can slash interest and debt service payments on a $100 million loan by as much as $3 million over a 30-year period.

The Big Three also assigned the highest short-term rating to the County’s $800 million Tax and Revenue Anticipation Note (TRAN) issuance, which will finance current operations before tax revenues are received.

“Excellent credit ratings mean lower interest payments, saving the County millions of dollars that can instead be used to pay for critically needed public services,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas. “It also validates the County’s prudent, disciplined and conservative fiscal management with long-term strategic planning over the last several years.”

The credit ratings upgrade came after Board Chairman Ridley-Thomas, along with the County’s Chief Executive Officer Sachi Hamai, Auditor-Controller John Naimo, and Treasurer and Tax Collector Joseph Kelly met with representatives of the Big Three in New York late last month. Health Agency Director Mitch Katz, M.D. participated by teleconference.

They discussed the County’s efforts to build reserves, pre-fund long-term liabilities, and stabilize the Department of Health Services during a time of uncertainty over the fate of the Affordable Care Act. They also noted the County successfully went to voters seeking ongoing revenue for combatting homeless, which constitutes a threat to the solvency of the County with respect to the drain on resources associated with law enforcement and emergency health services.

The County, which has a budget of approximately $30 billion, has a track record of fiscally responsible practices, which allowed it to weather the Great Recession without substantial service cutbacks or any layoffs.