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MLK Master Plan Meeting, October 26, 2011

The third community meeting for the MLK Medical Center Master Plan took place on October 25, 2011 at MLK. The County has invested nearly $3 Million to develop a long-term comprehensive master plan to more strategically use campus to provide high quality patient health care services, research, teaching and economic development opportunities. The master planning process provides an opportunity to think critically about the needs of patients, medical staff, community members and businesses and develop a plan for a new center that is reflective of those needs.

Over 100 community members participated in the meeting focused on the review of four distinct draft community models for the master plan. Each community model is structured differently to meet the critical needs that have been identified by the community in previous meetings. Each model provides opportunities for expansion of medical services, economic opportunities, recreational and community space, and education and research. After a presentation by master planning firm, Gensler, community members were invited to visit stations around the room and provide feedback about how they would feel using each space. The presentation and materials are available below:

Master Plan Presentation (PDF document)
Station Boards (PDF document)

Community comments will inform the final community master plan which will be presented at a final community meeting in early 2012. To provide your thoughts on the materials shared at the community meeting, please contact Clarice Nash at 626-300-2363 or email MLKJR.MP@gmail.com.

5th Annual Inglewood Open Studios

Dozens of Inglewood artists will open their studios to the public the weekend of November 12-13, 2011 from 1:00pm to 6:00pm during the fifth annual Inglewood Open Studios tour. The event, hosted by Inglewood artists and nonprofit Inglewood Cultural Arts (ICA), will allow visitors to personally tour the studios of established and emerging artists working in drawing, painting, sculpture, mixed-media, photography, installation, and performance. In addition to the tour, Inglewood Open Studios also features a group show, which includes work by all participating tour artists, at the gallery within the Beacon Arts Building from Saturday, November 12 through Saturday, November 26, 2011.

In addition to providing the gallery space for the Inglewood Open Studios group show, local gallery and artist community, Beacon Arts Building and its sister location, 1019 WEST Art Studios will also sponsor an opening reception for the exhibit on November 12, 7:00-10:00pm. Gallery hours for the group show are Thursday to Saturday 1:00pm to 6:00pm and Sunday 1:00-4:00pm. Beacon Arts Building (http://www.beaconartsbuilding.com / 310-419-4077) is located at 808 N. La Brea Ave., Inglewood, CA 90302.

Convenient free shuttle bus service, that will run in a continuous loop, will be provided to the public on both Open Studios tour days. Printed maps with Open Studios location details are available online and will be at each artist’s studio and at Beacon Arts on both tour days. For additional information on Inglewood Open Studios, including the printable tour map, please
see www.inglewoodopenstudios.com and
http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=164011226949989#!/event.php?eid=164011226949989.

Participating Artists –
Inglewood Open Studios participants include art educators, self-taught artists, and a significant number of graduates from nearby Otis College of Art and Design. Artists to be announced…

Inglewood, CA –
Inglewood is bordered by the LAX International Airport and surrounded by the nearby cities of El Segundo, Playa Del Rey, Marina Del Rey, Westchester, Culver City, and Torrance — nestled in the center of Los Angeles County.

Inglewood Cultural Arts – www.inglewoodculturalarts.org
Inglewood Cultural Arts (ICA) is a multidisciplinary nonprofit arts organization serving residents of Inglewood and its surrounding communities. ICA’s mission is to enhance the quality of life in the community by providing diverse cultural arts programs.

Sculptor Cliff Garten completes commission for a new public health facility in South Los Angeles


[pullquote_right]”When I first walked into the lobby, I saw the scale and had this vision for an illuminated piece. Because I create sculptures that respond directly to their environments, I felt that the illuminated quality of the sculpture would create a meditative, ethereal and uplifting experience for patients of the MLK Center for Public Health,” said Cliff Garten.[/pullquote_right]Sculptor Cliff Garten’s masterpiece Elevations (1) is on display at the Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK) Center for Public Health in Willowbrook. “Elevations (1)” is a seven-by-seven foot illuminated sculpture with a corresponding Venetian plaster wall that measures 12 feet wide and 22 feet tall. The white and black wall drawing mimics the curves of the sculpture and was applied using a stencil technique. A distressed finish was chosen for the wall’s surface to contrast to the precision of the lines, and metallic silver powder was added to the wall to create a silver sheen. The reflection of light on the wall’s surface illuminates the sculpture and enhances the visual interaction between the two elements.

Garten who is known to have the ability to connect people to places through sculptural material , social history and ecology ,has completed more than 50 artworks within the public realm throughout the U.S. and Canada. His aim is to activate and enliven public spaces, Elevation (1) is his first Los Angeles County civic art commission. “When I first walked into the lobby, I saw the scale and had this vision for an illuminated piece. Because I create sculptures that respond directly to their environments, I felt that the illuminated quality of the sculpture would create a meditative, ethereal and uplifting experience for patients of the MLK Center for Public Health,” said Garten, who has also donated a series of 10 archival digital prints that are displayed throughout the facility.

Park to Playa trail final plan review

Come review the Final Plan and learn about next steps for the Park to Playa Trail.  During the first and second workshop we heard your ideas on where the trail should go within the parks, what connections to park facilities and community destinations should be made and what types of amenities make for a fun and enjoyable trail experience.

Please attend the final workshop to learn about the results from the Feasibility Study and Wayfinding Plan and the next steps for the Park to Playa Trail.

WHEN
Wednesday, Nov. 2
7 pm – 9 pm

WHERE
Kenneth Hahn State Recreation Area Community Meeting Room
4100 La Cienega Blvd
Los Angeles, CA
Directions: The community meeting room is located in the Community Center past the park entrance gates and Gwen Moor Lake on the south side of the road.

QUESTIONS
Contact:
Ana Petrlic @ (323) 221-9944 x107 ana.petrlic@mrca.ca.gov
Hosted By:
The Office of Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas and the Mountains Recreation & Conservation Authority

The Park to Playa Vision
In 2000, the “Park to Playa” vision was first articulated: a seamless trail connecting urban residents with the natural coast. The trail will connect approximately 13 miles from the Baldwin Hills along Ballona Creek to the Ballona Wetlands and the beach bicycle path. The Ballona Creek portion of the trail is now implemented. The current study will define the location and design of the eastern portion of the trail, passing through several parks and jurisdictions in the Baldwin Hills area, starting at the Stocker Corridor to the east and connecting parts of the trail systems of Ruben Ingold Park, Norman O. Houston Park, Kenneth Hahn State Recreation Area, and Baldwin Hills Scenic Overlook to the west.

Come celebrate the final plan and learn about the next steps. During the first and second workshop we heard your ideas on where the trail should go within the parks, what connections to park facilities and community destinations should be made and what types of amenities make for a fun and enjoyable trail experience. Please join us at the final workshop to learn about the results from the Feasibility Study and Wayfinding Plan and the next steps for the Park to Playa Trail.

Click here to download the flyer.

Can’t Make the Meeting?

There are other ways to participate:

• Download the Study and maps online
Baldwin Hills Regional Conservation Authority (BHRCA) website
Baldwin Hills Conservancy (BHC) website

• Send us comments or questions by email: emilyduchon@altaplanning.com

Civic leaders commemorate 140th anniversary of the Chinatown massacre

Vowing to keep alive the memory of Los Angeles’ first deadly race riot, two dozen political, academic and civic leaders gathered Sunday morning at the El Pueblo de Los Angles historic monument downtown to commemorate the 140th anniversary of the Chinatown massacre.  Businessman David Louie, the event’s organizer, called the October 24, 1871 massacre “the most callous act of racial violence in the city’s history.” Louie said he convened the group of elected officials, scholars and community activists mainly to revive the memory of the massacre and possibly start an effort to hold a larger annual public ceremony to memorialize the historic event. Louie is a member of the City of Los Angeles El Pueblo De Los Angeles Historical Monument Authority Commission.

William Estrada, a historian with the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, presented an overview of the massacre, which took place in the city’s original Chinatown, the area now across from Union Station.

The rioting began after a man named Robert Thompson was inadvertently shot in the crossfire between two feuding Chinese secret societies. A mob of 500 formed on Calle de los Negros (now Los Angeles Street) and roamed through Chinatown, shooting Chinese men and constructing two makeshift gallows to hang others. The death toll reached 19, all Chinese. The rioters had included a reporter for the Los Angeles Star and a Los Angeles City Councilman.

Nine men were initially prosecuted for the crimes and eight were convicted of manslaughter in Los Angeles. The California Supreme Court, in overturning the convictions, cited an 1863 law prohibiting Chinese from testifying against whites in criminal trials.

Estrada said the Los Angeles massacre became a top national news story, eclipsing the great Chicago fire, which had occurred earlier that month.

Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas noted the group assembled Sunday was composed of “people of various ethnicities, who understand we must never forget our history, so that we may in the future stand on much higher ground.” Supervisor Ridley-Thomas also noted the name of Los Angeles Street at the time, Calle de los Negros, reflected the racial animosity in Los Angeles at that time, which has been pervasive in the city’s history.

Along with Ridley-Thomas, Assembly Member Mike Eng, South Pasadena Mayor Mike Ten and Alhambra Board of Education member Robert Gin joined the commemoration. Suellen Cheng, curator of the El Pueblo Historical Monument and members of the Chinese American Citizens Alliance also attended the ceremony. Assembly member Mike Eng, delivering a closing prayer, told the group that social inequities like the ones underlying the 1871 massacre persist today, and were reflected in the “Occupy Los Angeles” tent city demonstration a few blocks away. Eng then read the names of the 19 who died in the massacre, and as he read each name, the bell in El Pueblo commemorating the start of the Mexican Revolution was rung for each victim.