FREE Flu Shots

Flu Vaccine

Flu vaccines are recommended for everyone six months of age and older, including healthy adults. It’s especially important to get a flu vaccine if you are:

6 months through 18 years old
50 years or older
Pregnant or just had a baby
Morbidly obese
A health care provider
Living in a nursing or other long-term care home
Living with a weakened immune system or a chronic medical condition (like diabetes, heart disease or lung disease)
Living with or caring for someone under 5 years old, 50 years of age or older, with a chronic medical condition

More information including dates, times and location of flu shots.

More dates

Reducing Salt Can Decrease Hypertension

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health released a report showing that reducing daily salt intake can potentially lead to substantial decreases in the number of Angelenos with hypertension (high blood pressure) in the county, and saving many millions of dollars in annual treatment costs. The study found that if Angelenos, who on average take in about 50% more salt than recommended, could collectively decrease their average intake by just 20% (687 mg of
sodium) per day, it would result in a decrease of about 52,629 hypertension cases in the county and an annual cost savings of $102 million dollars.

“Decreasing salt in one’s diet is a significant step towards reducing life-threatening conditions such as high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, or chronic kidney disease,” said Jonathan E. Fielding, MD, MPH, Director of Public Health and Health Officer.

“Minimizing salt would greatly reduce the estimated $400 billion the nation spends annually on treating hypertension and heart disease.”

Hypertension is a chronic condition that greatly increases the risk of medical complications and death from cardiovascular and kidney diseases, such as heart attack, stroke, heart failure and end-stage kidney failure. In LA County, 48% of adults ages 45-64 years have hypertension, with the highest rates found among African Americans. Elevated blood pressure is increasingly becoming a problem among children ages 8-17 years, with greater increases seen among Hispanic and African American children.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, currently recommends that each person consumes, at most, 6 mg of salt (2,300 mg of sodium or 1 teaspoon of salt) per day. This figure is even lower (1,500 mg or 2/3 teaspoon per day) for those that have high blood pressure, are over 40 years of age, or are African American. Most Americans consume, on average, more than 3,400 mg of sodium daily; this is 48% more than the recommended limit.

“The most important thing consumers can do is look at the label; low calorie does not always mean low salt,” said Dr. Fielding. “While restaurants and food manufacturers look at ways they can decrease salt in the foods they prepare, consumers can protect their health by reading nutrition labels, familiarizing themselves with healthy sodium numbers and creating healthier home recipes using less salt.”

With more Americans eating away from home, processed and restaurant prepared foods now account for more than two-third of the salt consumed in the U.S. The report recommends preparing and eating more fresh food at home and reading food labels or asking for salt content information when eating at restaurants. Research shows that lowering the amount of salt in one’s diet can be done with minimal changes to taste when salt reduction is done gradually over time.

VIDEO: Supervisor Ridley-Thomas Celebrates Milestone With Erection Of Concrete Walls For The $20 Million South Health Center Project

Project will provide quality healthcare and economic benefits to the region

Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas was on hand for the erection of exterior concrete panel walls for the new South Health Center, a milestone in the construction of the $20 million project that will provide a number of vital public health services in the Second District.

The South Health Center is the first of several projects scheduled for construction in the region surrounding the New Martin Luther King, Jr. Medical Center. Scheduled for completion in December 2012, the MLK Medical Center and the other capital investment projects will serve as an asset in the community, providing a much needed economic boost in the area.

In June, Supervisor Ridley-Thomas joined community leaders and stakeholders to break ground on the South Health Center, which the Supervisor said is on schedule with no major issues or concerns.

Located at the northwest corner of 120th Street and Wilmington Avenue in the unincorporated Watts-Willowbrook area, the new outpatient public health center will provide immunizations and services to treat various conditions, including sexually transmitted diseases, tuberculosis, and communicable diseases.

The South Health Center, one of several new capital investments for the region, will create over 10,000 new jobs in the community, along with the much anticipated new MLK Medical Center, Multi-Service Ambulatory Care Center, and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority Rosa Parks Station.

“We are standing at the epicenter of a great opportunity to address the healthcare crisis, not just South Los Angeles, but the entire nation,” Supervisor Ridley-Thomas said.

The Supervisor remains committed to hiring local residents for these projects, issuing a challenge for everyone to join him in his efforts to open doors to provide critically important employment to citizens who live nearby.

“We are very excited to see the South Health Center project moving forward,” the Supervisor said. “I look forward to the grand opening of this center in the very near future.”

VIDEO: Unprecedented Anti-Smoking Campaign Launched By HHS Secretary Sebelius and Supervisor Ridley-Thomas

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius today joined Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas and county Health Officer Dr. Jonathan E. Fielding to announce the start of the most aggressive, comprehensive anti-smoking campaign in L.A. County history to reach communities with high smoking rates across the county. This anti-tobacco effort will include several policy-based initiatives, social services and support for quit smoking efforts, as well as a high-profile and highly targeted media campaign to support a broad range of tobacco control efforts and raise awareness of free and low-cost resources to help smokers quit. These tactics will aim to ultimately reduce secondhand smoke exposure, discourage tobacco use, reduce consumption of tobacco products, strengthen youth smoking prevention efforts, and increase access to and utilization of effective tobacco cessation services.

More