Willowbrook, MLK

Planning for Phase Two of MLK Community Hospital

Hoping to gain a clear understanding of the services needed and the number of patients that will use the newly opened Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has asked the Department of Health Services to work with the hospital’s leadership to compile quarterly reports on the number of emergency room visits, hospital occupancy rates and average lengths of stay for patients.

“It is critical that we in the county have this data at our disposal to determine whether additional investments for in-patient services and facilities are required to meet the needs of the surrounding community and service area,” said Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, who authored the motion that was approved. “The opening of this new, state of the art facility has always been the first phase of more to come. We will continue building for the future of this hospital and the other facilities on the MLK campus as it is needed. This community will not be neglected.”

The hospital opened its doors to the public on July 7, marking the beginning of a new era in healthcare delivery at the MLK Medical Campus. The opening is a milestone that allows patients to begin using the 131-bed community hospital. The hospital, which is privately run and is leasing the property from the county, has 21 beds in its emergency room and intensive care unit, a labor and delivery unit as well as four operating rooms equipped with latest technology and 10 post-anesthesia care unit beds in addition to other services.

In addition, the Medical Campus surrounding the hospital offers an Outpatient Center for preventive care, a mental health urgent care center to help patients with psychiatric services, a Center for Public Health offering vaccinations and reproductive health information and soon a recuperative care center for homeless patients to recover after being released from the hospital, a medical office building for doctors to see patients, an autism center and more.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Hospital Receives Official Go-Ahead

Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas celebrated the new Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Hospital receiving the official seal of approval Tuesday from the nation’s oldest and largest standards-setting and accrediting body in healthcare.

“Today is indeed a good day for Los Angeles,” he said. “Accreditation by The Joint Commission clears the final hurdle to restore quality hospital services at the MLK Medical Campus and marks the beginning of a new era in health care delivery in the Willowbrook community and beyond.”

“I want to convey heartfelt congratulations to the Martin Luther King, Jr., Community Hospital staff, the Board of Directors and the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services for all of the tireless work they have invested in making this day a reality,” he added. “I look forward to the August 7 community dedication that will celebrate the facility’s formal opening. It is indeed a brand new day at MLK.”

After rigorous inspections, The Joint Commission, which evaluates and accredits more than 20,500 health care organizations and programs in the United States, concluded that the Martin Luther King, Jr., Community Hospital met standards for safety and quality of care in infection control, surgical services, medical record keeping, pharmaceutical services and a clean physical environment.

Built by Los Angeles County at a cost of $210 million, Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Hospital is a state-of-the-art safety net that will provide compassionate, collaborative, quality care – regardless of citizenship or ability to pay. It has 131 beds, including 29 in the Emergency Room and 20 in Intensive Care. However, this is only Phase I of the project and another expansion is envisioned in the future.

The hospital is part of a $650-million medical campus that is a new model for healthcare delivery that emphasizes preventive care and holistic health with an Outpatient Center, Mental Health Urgent Care Center, Center For Public Health and, soon, a Recuperative Care Center serving homeless patients and an office building for doctors.

Ridley-Thomas Advocates for Level I Trauma Center in South LA

Doctors and nurses pushing patient on gurney through emergency room

Given the high incidence of trauma-related deaths in the South Los Angeles area, Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas has asked county officials to determine how to bring a Level I trauma care center to South Los Angeles.

Supervisor Ridley-Thomas’ motion, which was adopted by the Board of Supervisors June 30, asks for a comprehensive report to be completed by the fall which will include a timeline detailing the necessary steps.

Level 1 trauma centers have more resources available to provide total care for every aspect of trauma injury, from prevention through rehabilitation.  They are also research and teaching facilities.

“Ensuring quality trauma care is a priority for me,” said Supervisor Ridley-Thomas. “We need more information and analysis to get a complete picture of the county’s trauma care needs. In particular, the trauma care system must provide intensive services, including trauma prevention strategies in those ‘hot spot’ areas with persistently high trauma mortality rates.”

The latest data shows that Los Angeles County as a whole has one of the best trauma care systems in the world, with the overall mortality rate at 3.6 percent well below the national average of 4.2 percent. However, South Los Angeles accounts for 20 percent of the trauma-related deaths, while it is only 10 percent of Los Angeles County’s population.

The new MLK Community Hospital, which is scheduled to open this summer, will have an Emergency Department with 21 beds, staffed 24-hours a day, seven-days a week to treat serious, life-threatening conditions that are not caused by traumatic injuries. 

“I look forward to the report in the fall so we can move as quickly as possible on this effort,” said Supervisor Ridley-Thomas.

Dr. Mitchell Katz, Director of the Department of Health Services, supported the motion stating that: “We are committed to placing the most extensive resources in the areas that they are most needed.  South LA had a level one trauma unit in the past because of the high rate of trauma in that section of the county, and we want to restore that capability.”

 

Video: A New Day at MLK

The hospital is part of the MLK Medical Campus, which includes a new Outpatient Center, a Mental Health Urgent Care Center and the Center for Public Health. Soon, the campus will also have a community garden, recuperative care center, a new child medical hub and many more services. The Medical Campus delivers on a promise to bring quality, preventive health care delivery to South Los Angeles residents.

To view a 60-second sizzle reel highlighting MLK Campus, click here.  Click here for the full save the date flyer. Click here for the flyer in Spanish. Below is a timeline marking important events for the medical campus from 1965 to the present.

MLK History Timeline

Doctor’s Office Building Coming to MLK Campus

Hospital Staff at Reception Desk

For the first time in its long history, the Martin Luther King Jr. Medical Campus is poised to get a medical office building to house physicians as well as other healthcare providers as part of a broader plan to transform the medical campus into a center for innovation and medical excellence.

The Board of Supervisors agreed Tuesday to have the Community Development Commission begin negotiations with developer Trammell Crow to lease the land owned by the County. It is hoped that construction will begin within 18 months and that the 50,000 square foot facility will open in 2018.

In a new era of healthcare, where providers are rewarded for keeping people healthy, the new medical offices will play a key role. The physicians affiliated with the new hospital will be able to see their patients in a state-of-the-art facility located in their community and in close proximity to the new hospital. The area surrounding the Martin Luther King Jr. Medical Campus historically experienced a shortage of primary care and other providers and rates of preventable diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure and raised levels of cholesterol are high.

“This is an important piece of the medical campus puzzle that has always been missing,” said Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, who authored the motion. “With the Outpatient Center, the Mental Health Urgent Care Center, the Center for Public Health, a brand new hospital, this medical office building and other new initiatives coming, we are truly on our way to creating a holistic approach to healthcare on this campus.”