Singing the Praises of a Jazz Legend

In honor of International Jazz Day, Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas awarded a scroll to the world-renowned vocalist, Barbara Morrison, the most recorded jazz and blues artist of her generation.

During the ceremony, she sang a beautiful rendition of Duke Ellington’s Come Sunday, drawing enthusiastic applause from the audience in the Board of Supervisors hearing room at the Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration.

“I’m pleased to recognize Barbara Morrison, who has entertained and influenced jazz enthusiasts throughout the world for nearly six decades,” Supervisor Ridley-Thomas said. 

Morrison has been entertaining and influencing jazz enthusiasts for nearly six decades, since her professional career began at age 10 with a performance at a Detroit radio station.

She relocated to Los Angeles in 1973 and began performing with blues artists Eddie Vinson and Johnny Otis. She recorded her first solo album in 1985 and now has more than 20 albums featuring original compositions of live and studio performances.

Since 1994, Morrison has taught jazz vocal classes at UCLA’s Herb Alpert School of Music. She has received three Grammy nominations, been recognized by National Public Radio as one of the Voices of the Century: 50 Greatest Female Jazz Vocalists, and received a Motown Heroes and Legends Award in 2015, Morrison continues to perform with her duo and trio throughout California and worldwide.  

Her list of accomplishments includes performing with noted jazz and blues artists such as Dizzy Gillespie, Ray Charles, Etta James, Nancy Wilson, Tony Bennett, Esther Phillips and the Count Basie Orchestra. She has performed in such highly regarded venues as Carnegie Hall, the North Sea Jazz Festival, the Bern Jazz Festival and the Playboy Jazz Festival.

She opened the Barbara Morrison Performing Arts Center in 2008, and the California Jazz and Blues Museum seven years later, in the heart of the African American arts scene at the historic Leimert Park District of Los Angeles.