Construction Completed on Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital

Construction of the new Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital has been completed, bringing the community of Willowbrook and surrounding areas closer to seeing their new health care facility become reality.

The hospital is expected to serve 1.2 million residents from all over South Los Angeles including Compton, Inglewood, Watts-Willowbrook and Lynwood. It will also create more than 5,000 jobs in the area with approximately 700 directly at the hospital. The hospital, which will be privately run, is scheduled to open to the public in early 2015 after the new staff is in place and it passes through rigorous state licensing requirements.

The hospital, which houses four operating rooms, 21 treatment bays and will include 131 patient beds, cost $285 million to build.  It will be governed by the Martin Luther King, Jr. Los Angeles Healthcare Corporation (MLK-LA), an independent, nonprofit organization that is committed to establishing and maintaining high quality medical services in the community.

Both the Hospital and Outpatient Center were constructed with more than 50 percent local worker participation.

The adjacent Outpatient Center is also near completion and is scheduled to open in late spring of 2014. The Outpatient Center, meanwhile, will have 104 exam rooms, radiology and mammogram equipment and five operating rooms and cost $175 million to build.

The Hospital and Outpatient Center are part of a medical complex that will focus on preventive care in addition to inpatient services.

The closure of the former Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center in 2007 left the area without a hospital or true healthcare.  When he was elected to office in 2008, Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas made opening a new state of the art hospital and outpatient center a priority.

“This medical campus is coming together as promised, with state of the art facilities, technology and highly experienced professionals,” said Supervisor Ridley-Thomas. “This community deserves top notch health care facilities that will be looked upon as a first-rate, 21st century medical village.”

Mobile Eye Clinic Helps Kids See

Seven-year-old Carlos Urrutia has struggled for years to see the front board in his classroom, which always seems to be blurry. But recently, he stepped into the Vision to Learn mobile clinic to get fitted for a new pair of glasses.

“I’m excited because I’ll be able to see with glasses,” Carlos said. “Right now it looks blurry, I can’t see far away.”

In about three weeks, his new pair of glasses will be delivered to him at school.

“When I get my glasses I’m going to see my ABC’s good,” said Carlos, a 2nd grader at 52nd Street Elementary school.

Founded by former Los Angeles Deputy Mayor, Austin Beutner, Vision to Learn brings trained doctors and state-of-the-art mobile eye clinics to elementary schools throughout low-income communities in Los Angeles and provides students with free eye exams and glasses. Since the program began in March 2012, the mobile clinics have provided free glasses to more than 14,500 students and have visited 108 Los Angeles Unified School District, charter and catholic schools an average of 25 times each month.

Samuel Sanchez, also a second grader, has trouble with assignments in the classroom because he can’t see well.

“When my teacher writes words on the board, I can’t see them and I write the wrong letters,” Samuel said.

Samuel is excited about his new pair of glasses but he is a little worried he might break or lose them.

“I’m a little nervous that I’ll drop my glasses,” said Samuel. “I’m going to protect them and keep them away from my 2-year-old sister, she breaks everything.”

[raw]According to Vision to Learn, nearly one-quarter-million young children across California do not have the glasses they need to read their books, see the chalkboard, or participate in class. According to a study by the UCLA Schools of Medicine and Public Health, more than 20 percent of elementary school students in low-income communities have a vision problem and 96 percent of those students who need glasses do not have them.

The Vision to Learn program has changed the lives of many children, but also the doctors who drive around in the mobile eye clinic.

Ramon Vega, an optician with Vision to Learn has been with the program since it began last year.

Monday through Friday he leaves his home in Cudahay at 6:15 a.m. to meet fellow optician Sherry Pastor to pick up the mobile eye clinic from an LAUSD school bus parking lot in downtown Los Angeles and drives to the scheduled school for the day.

“I love my job and I love what I do,” said Vega, whose most cherished memory of his job is having children hug him to say thank you for the glasses. “I fulfill my purpose and serve my community.”

Pastor recalls distributing glasses this time last year at Rose Hills Academy Elementary in Lincoln Heights when she noticed a magnifying glass attached to a fourth graders backpack.

“I asked what it was for and the little girl said that it was to read and do her homework,” Pastor said. “I put the glass on her and she covered both hands with her mouth. She was shocked. I drove home and cried.”
After being examined, first grader, Heber Romero, 6, chose a pair of red glasses.

“I’m going to wear my glasses all day –when I do my homework, at lunch and in class,” Heber said.

Similarly, once the black glasses were placed on 7-year-old, Michael Alexander’s face he didn’t want to take them off.
“I like these glasses,” Michael said. “Now I can see.”
[/raw]

Star Apartments Open New Clinic

The Star Apartment project, a newly built supportive housing site for the homeless, also will be home to a new Department of Health Services primary care clinic that will specialize in providing integrated health care services to homeless people and residents of supportive housing.

The building, owned by the Skid Row Housing Trust, will house the Star Clinic on the ground level and the department’s Housing for Health offices, with 102 residential units above. Funding for the clinic was recently approved by the Board of Supervisors.

Seventy-Eight tenants already have moved into the building, located on 6th Street and Maple Avenue, with the rest scheduled to move in by the end of December. Designed by notable architect Michael Maltzan, the building is made of prefabricated residences that were placed on top of a concrete superstructure. Formerly an elevated parking garage, the building will include a basketball court and track on its former roof for the tenants. The UniHealth Foundation, Conrad N. Hilton Foundation and Gensler Architecture also contributed to the project.

Based on other similar projects, the Department of Health Services anticipates a 75 percent reduction in unnecessary emergency room visits and inpatient admissions for tenants who are housed in the the Star apartments.

Located along the border of Skid Row, the project has been praised by architecture and urban design experts for setting a new standard for remodeling an existing 1-story building and adding new community spaces and residential levels above. In addition, there will be a community garden in the space for residents to enjoy.

“The Star Apartments will offer high quality housing, services and amenities to help folks get back on their feet and live productive lives,” said Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, whose office contributed $400,000 for the project. “It is essential that we offer these types of homes for people in need across our community.”

Affordable Care Act Revisited

So much has been made about the Affordable Care Act’s troubles, that the law’s substantial benefits have largely been lost in the conversation. Here is a quick primer on how the law is benefiting millions of Americans and why California’s health care exchange, Covered California,is being held up as a model for the country to see how this law can work. 

The Affordable Care Act is a lifeline for most of the 1.7 million uninsured people in Los Angeles County.  In fact, the Affordable Care Act will help 7 out of every 10 uninsured people in our county.

There will be a small percentage of Californians who will see their healthcare costs go up, but more than 32 million Californians get to keep their preferred coverage, and another 4 million have the opportunity to become insured. Nearly 900,000 people must buy better benefits because their existing plans have too many holes in the coverage, including a lack of preventive care or plans without a cap on out-of-pocket costs. Nonetheless, Covered California estimates that one out of every three of these 900,000 people statewide who have to buy better benefits, will qualify for a tax credit to reduce their costs.

Also, it is important to remember is that the ACA is the first step toward affordable universal health care and good things take time. When Massachusetts launched its own health care law in 2006, only 123 people signed up—or less than 1percent of those who eventually signed up within the enrollment period—in the first month. With several years of health reform under its belt, Massachusetts has seen significant reductions in healthcare disparities and inequities, and now has the smallest percentage of uninsured residents of all 50 states.

Here is a basic primer on the benefits of this law:

  • For one, insurance companies have to be more transparent with their charges and their quality so you can make a better choice.
  • Your out-of-pocket expenses will be capped.
  • Insurance companies cannot deny you coverage or charge you higher rates because of your gender or because you have a preexisting medical condition, like cancer or diabetes.
  • Insurance companies must all provide you certain critical health services and must give you preventive care visits for free.
  • Insurance companies use 80-85 percent of the money you pay for health services rather than administrative costs.
  • Insurance companies must allow you to keep your kids on your plan until they turn 26.

For more information please click here

The Affordable Care Act – Have Your Say

One of our favorite ways of hearing from you on important current events is to take a camera out into the Second District and ask for your opinions. This month we asked a random sampling of district residents for their thoughts about the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare. Take a look at the video to hear opinions that range from for and against to simply confused.

Below is a slideshow we hope will serve as a starting point for further research:

Care Harbor Offer of Free Medical Care Attracts Thousands

Blankets wrapped around her shoulders and a packed meal in her hand, 29-year-old Andrea Adams, a South Los Angeles resident, spent several days in the cold and the rain, waiting for the doors to open at the Los Angeles Sports Arena where she would receive a wristband that would give her access to the 5th annual Care Harbor Los Angeles free medical clinic. Unemployed now for two years, Adams has been looking for an opportunity to have her braces removed and to receive necessary dental work. As she looked at the line, snaking its way around the Sports Arena, she shook her head.

“Jobs are hard to get,” she said. “You can’t take insurance for granted. This has really opened my eyes for sure.”

[raw]Thousands of people such as Adams braved the elements—some enduring the discomfort of two days on blankets and chairs waiting on the sidewalk—for a chance to receive free medical, dental and vision care at Care Harbor Los Angeles, which was held from Oct. 31 through Nov. 3.

At Care Harbor, hundreds of doctors, dentists nurses and other volunteers provided free healthcare, prevention resources and follow-up care to thousands of uninsured, underinsured and at-risk individuals and families. No one with a wristband was turned away.[/raw]

Although the wait for wristbands was long, it is worth it for many who have not seen a doctor or dentist in years, said Howard Kahn, chief executive of L.A. Care Health Plan, a major sponsor of the Care Harbor event.

“A lot of folks are willing to wait a long time to get care,” he said. “What is striking is the diversity. You see young and old, working and not working, white, black, brown. The need is there.”

Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors Chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas, whose office is co-sponsoring Care Harbor, said that the event relies on people volunteering their time to help and demonstrates how a community can come together to aid those in need.

“Care Harbor reminds us that Americans can pull together and compassionately, share their ingenuity, skills, expertise, time and money, to help those who are less fortunate,” he said.

Enrique Sanchez of East Los Angeles spent a night in line as well. Initially he hoped to get a wristband for his mother-in-law who is in a wheelchair and who needs dental care, but he thought he should also try to get one for himself, for dental care and to have a doctor look at his bad back.

“I hope to get insurance one day,” he said, noting that he was unemployed. “But for now, this is a good opportunity to get some help.”

Janet Willison and her 9-year-old daughter Lana hoped to get medical treatment for an injury. Although Lana had spent the night at a friend’s house, Willison had been in line for a day, waiting for wristbands for both of them: Lana needed to see a doctor to repair an injury she received after a ball hit her right eye, and Willison, needed a mammogram and pap smear, and to have her blood pressure checked.

“My eyesight is really bad,” Lana said, adding that she had to ask her teachers to be seated in the front of the class in order to be able to see well.”

Willison, who is a realtor in South L.A., said she and her husband had recently lost a vending machine business, making it very difficult to afford healthcare coverage. Although there are news reports about the economy turning around, Willison said she continues to see struggling.

“I deal with a lot of people losing their homes. It has been a very tough year,” she said. “I understand. After a while, you lose your pride and you do what you need to do for your family.”

Psychiatric Care Coming to MLK Medical Campus

[raw]
Nearly one in four adults—or 57.7 million Americans—have a mental health disorder and need help. In Los Angeles, in desperate need of psychiatric services, yet there are too few available resources and outlets for treatment. Hospital emergency rooms have become ground zero for psychiatric patients in need of help—providing only temporary intervention at great expense.

Recently, community leaders and healthcare providers gathered to discuss plans for the Martin Luther King Jr. Psychiatric Urgent Care Center, a new facility that is expected to open next spring. The center will provide prompt, quality and culturally sensitive care to both adults and teens.

The center, which will be on the Martin Luther King Jr. Medical Campus where the new Hospital and Outpatient Center will open, will offer psychiatric evaluation and assessment, crisis intervention, medication support and medication management. Also available will be individual and family treatment, alcohol and drug counseling and prevention, domestic violence screening and referrals to other community resources where people can seek help.[/raw]

The center will be run by Exodus Recovery, Inc., which has been providing psychiatric and chemical dependency treatment services in Southern California since 1989. The organization has developed and established several hospital-based inpatient and outpatient programs, a psychiatric and internal medicine provider group and a behavioral health managed care company.

The care received will be immediate and comprehensive including appropriate discharge within 24 hours to services spanning the entire spectrum of mental health treatment within the community,” said Luana Murphy, Chief Executive of Exodus Recovery, Inc. “This results in a significant decrease in the number of clients requiring hospitalizations, freeing up inpatient resources for those most in need.”

Although there is an emphasis on serving the indigent and Medi-Cal patients, no one will be turned away. Anyone over the age of 13 will be accepted, however, adolescents who are admitted will be housed upstairs and adults downstairs.

The approach to helping patients will be all encompassing, with psychologists, social workers, nurses, case workers and housing specialists on hand to help people get back on their feet. In addition, the center is expected to have strong ties to community centers, faith-based organizations and housing resources to continue offering services to those in need.

“Young people often react positively from the immediate attention and services provided in a more calming environment than can be found in a busy Emergency Department,” added Murphy. “They interact not only with professionals but will also be in the company of other adolescents with whom they can relate.”

School Based Health Clinics Deliver Holistic Care

School-based clinics are the wave of the future for wellness and prevention services. To that end, creating and expanding school based health centers has been a priority for Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas for the past decade. As a state legislator, he authored several bills in support of school based health centers, and he has continued that work with many partners, including the Los Angeles Unified School District, St. John’s Well Child & Family Center and other private and nonprofit entities, collaborating to build 12 new school-based health centers in the Second District. At these centers, students and their families are offered both physical and mental health services in one place — providing easy access to care close to where people live, work and study. Considering that thousands of students have limited, inadequate or no regular access to preventative health care, the school-based health center model is set to profoundly impact the way healthcare is delivered.

FACT BOX

What is a school-based health center?

A school-based health center is a medical clinic located on a school campus. It provides comprehensive preventive primary and mental health services to students. Many are also open to the community. Most school-based health centers in the Second District are operated by private health care clinics that get some funding fromLos AngelesCounty’s Department of Health Services to help them serve patients without insurance.

Why locate a health center on a school campus?

The goal is to make healthcare easily accessible to young people and their families, as well as to the wider community. Studies have shown that students who receive good health care do better in school and are more likely to graduate. Also, many families feel more comfortable getting health care in familiar and trusted settings, like schools.

Are school-based health centers open to the community?

Yes. Many centers even have separate entrances – one facing the school for students and one facing the street for the community. These centers can serve as a medical home for the entire family because they are close, convenient and affordable.

What type of services do school-based health centers provide?

It varies site by site. Most school-based health centers provide a range of health care services, including physical examinations, mental health services, dental care, health education, family planning and substance abuse counseling.

How many school-based health centers are there in the County of Los Angeles?

There are 60 school-based health centers and four mobile vans that provide health services throughoutLos AngelesCounty. There are 24 in the Second District and eight new ones that will open by January of 2013. More information about the new SBHCs, including contact information, can be found in the site profile portion of this page.

How much do school-based health center health care services cost?

Cost is based on each patient’s ability to pay. Many school-based health centers will help patients enroll in free and low cost State and County health care programs, if they are eligible

Are centers cost effective?

Yes. School-based health centers significantly reduce costly and inappropriate emergency room use.

How do I access services at a school based health centers?

Walk-in hours as well as scheduled appointments are available. Please click through the site profiles in order to find the center closest to you.


Wellness Center at Manual Arts High School


4085 S. Vermont Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90037 http://goo.gl/maps/kabhJ
Appointment Line (323) 541-1631 Englishx1 Spanishx9

Hours of Operation

MF 8:30 am – 4 pm
Sat 7 am – 2:30 pm
Summer hours may vary

Wellness Center Providers

St. John’s Well Child & Family Center

LAUSD School Mental Health
LA Child Guidance Center

LAC Probation Department

Services Offered On-Site

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition
  • Health insurance enrollment

Wellness Center at Washington Preparatory High School

1555 West 110th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90047 http://goo.gl/maps/BQ5A3
Appointment Line (323) 541-1631 Englishx1 Spanishx9

Hours of Operation
T-Th 8:30 am – 5 pm
Summer hours may vary

Wellness Providers:

St. John’s Well Child & Family Center

LAUSD School Mental Health

Special Service for Groups

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Dental
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition
  • Health insurance enrollment

Wellness Center at Carson High School


270 East 223rd Street
Carson, CA 90745 http://goo.gl/maps/dOXeY

Appointment Line (310) 802-6170

Hours of Operation:
M W F 7:30 am – 4:30 pm (7:30-12pm every other Friday Summer hours may vary)

Wellness Center Providers:

South Bay Family Health Care Center

LAUSD School Mental Health

Children’s Bureau

Children’s Institute

Masada Homes

Harbor Area Substance Abuse Treatment Center

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Dental
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV Testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s Health
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition
  • Health insurance enrollment
  • Health Education

Wellness Center at Jefferson High School

Open Date October 18, 2012 (GO same date)
3410 S. Hooper Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90011 http://goo.gl/maps/Zoiqb

Appointment Line: (323) 908-4200

Hours of Operation
MWF 8 am – 3:30 pm
Summer hours may vary

Wellness Center Providers

South Central Family Health Center

LAUSD School Mental Health

Services Offered On-Site

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Dental
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition
  • Health insurance enrollment/li>
  • Health education
  • Crisis intervention

Wellness Center at Fremont High School


7821 S. Avalon Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90003 http://goo.gl/maps/MfNyz
Appointment Line (323) 404-9270

Hours of Operation
M 8:30 am – 12:00 pm
T , TH 8:30 am – 5 pm

Wellness Center Providers:

UMMA Clinic
Special Service for Groups

LAUSD Mental Health
LA Land Trust
Integrated School Health (LAC: DCFS, DHS, DMH, DPS and Probation)

Services Offered On-Site

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition
  • Health insurance enrollment
  • Health education

Wellness Center at Dominguez High School


15301 S. San Jose
Compton, CA 90221 http://goo.gl/maps/vt73o
Appointment Line (562) 630-6825 (Englishx1, Spanishx9)

Hours of Operation
MTWThF 8:30 am – 5 pm
Sat 7 am – 3 pm
Summer hours may vary

Wellness Center Providers:

St. John’s Well Child & Family Center
SHIELDS for Families

Services Offered On-Site

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Dental
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition
  • Health insurance enrollment
  • Health education

Jordan High School

10110 South Juniper Street
Los Angeles, CA 90002 http://goo.gl/maps/mkmkP

Appointment Line: (323) 488-5915

Hours of Operation:
T Th 7:30 am – 4:30 pm
F 1 – 5 pm

Wellness Providers:
Watts Healthcare Corporation
LAUSD School Mental Health

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Immunizations
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • Vision and hearing
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition

 

Hyde Park Elementary School

6505 8th Avenue
Bungalow 46
Los Angeles, CA 90043 http://goo.gl/maps/9KuVD
Appointment Line: (323) 750-9232

Hours of Operation:
M W TH F 8:30 am – 5 pm
T 8:30 am – 6:30 pm
Sat 7 am – 3:30 pm
Dental only available on Thursdays

Wellness Providers:
St. John’s Well Child & Family Center

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Prenatal care
  • Reproductive health
  • Nutrition
  • Health insurance enrollment
  • Dental services

 

Dorsey High School Mobile Clinic (students only)

3537 Farmdale Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90016 http://goo.gl/maps/9vaGt

Appointment Line: (323) 730-1920

Hours of Operation:
M 8:30 am – 10:30 am

Wellness Providers:
To Help Everyone Clinic (T.H.E. Clinic)

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Prenatal care
  • Reproductive health
  • Nutrition

 

Crenshaw High School Mobile Clinic (students only)

5010 11th Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90043 http://goo.gl/maps/ozmgg

Appointment Line: (323) 730-1920

Hours of Operation:
F 8:30 am – 10:30 am

Wellness Providers:
To Help Everyone Clinic (T.H.E. Clinic)

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Prenatal care
  • Reproductive health
  • Nutrition

 

Holmes Avenue Elementary School (Students Only)

5108 Holmes Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90058 http://goo.gl/maps/SxeuM

Appointment Line: (323) 587-3638

Hours of Operation:
MTWThF 8 am – 2:30 pm
Days and hours may vary by school calendar.

Wellness Providers:
LAUSD

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Immunizations
  • Physical exams

 

Los Angeles High School (Students Only)

4650 W. Olympic Boulevard
Los Angeles, California 90019 http://goo.gl/maps/4QMlC

Appointment Line: (213) 747-5542

Hours of Operation:
TTh 7:30 am – 4 pm

Wellness Providers:
Eisner Pediatric & Family Medical Center

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Prenatal care
  • Reproductive health

Foshay Learning Center

3751 S Harvard Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90018 http://bit.ly/1ccwdMJ

Appointment Line: (323) 373-9400

Hours of Operation:
MTWThF 8 am – 5 pm

 

Wellness Providers:
Northeast Community Clinic

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Family planning
  • Birth control
  • Health and nutrition education

Gardena High School (Students Only)

1301 West 182nd Street
Gardena, CA 90248 http://goo.gl/maps/oyrH8

Appointment Line: (310) 808-1180

Hours of Operation
MWThF 8 am – 4 pm

Wellness Providers:
Los Angeles County DHS
LAUSD

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Family planning
  • Birth control
  • Health and nutrition education
  • Mental health (Thursday & Friday)
  • Peer health educators

S. Mark Taper Health Clinic at The Accelerated School                                                     

4000 S. Main Street
Los Angeles, CA 90037 http://goo.gl/maps/2Vjw1

Appointment Line: (323) 908-4242

Hours of Operation:
M T W TH F 8 am – 4:30 pm

Wellness Providers:
South Central Family Health Center

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Preventive Health Screenings
  • School Sports Physicals
  • Health Counseling and Education
  • Routine Scheduled Immunizations for Children
  • Routine and Comprehensive Checkups for Children, Youth, and Adults

Lennox School District

10223 Firmona Ave
Lennox, California 90304 http://goo.gl/maps/E8Nhx

Appointment Line: (310) 695-4017

Hours of Operation:
M W 8 am – 5 pm
TH  1 pm – 5 pm

Wellness Providers:
To Help Everyone Clinic (T.H.E. Clinic)

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Prenatal care
  • Reproductive health
  • Nutrition
  • Dental Services coming soon

Culver City High School

4401 Elenda Street

Culver City, CA 90230 http://goo.gl/maps/o0WL

Appointment Line: (310) 842 – 4328

Hours of Operation:
Medical Services
M 8 am – 12 pm
W 8 am – 12 pm

Mental Health Services
MThF 8 am – 3 pm
W 8 am – 12 pm

Wellness Providers:
Venice Family Clinic

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Prenatal care
  • Reproductive health
  • Nutrition

Locke High School

316 East 111st Street
Los Angeles, CA 90061 http://goo.gl/maps/MkQEw

Appointment Line: (323) 450-2376

 

Hours of Operation:
M W 7:30 am – 4:30 pm
F 7:30  – 11:30 am

Wellness Providers:
Watts Healthcare Corporation
LAUSD Mental Health
SHIELDS for Families (Mental Health)
Green Dot

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Immunizations
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • Vision and hearing
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition

MLK Hospital Construction Nears Completion

[raw]Moving forward with construction of the new Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital in Willowbrook, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved $29 million to complete the County’s share of construction work on the facility within the next 60 to 90 days.

After the construction of hospital, which is 92 percent complete, is finished, the staffing and equipping of the facility will begin; the hospital is expected to open in early 2015. Workers will be on site, working overtime and on weekends to meet the Oct. 31 deadline to complete construction of the hospital. The adjacent Outpatient Center is also near completion and is scheduled to open in late spring of 2014.
After the board vote, Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors Chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas emphasized that the hospital, part of an entire medical complex with a focus on preventive care in addition to inpatient services, will be a model of cutting edge care for the region and the nation.

“We’re making wonderful progress, and I really think it’s important to understand that this is more than a hospital,” he said. “This is an entire medical campus that’s in the works. And if it takes a little more time to get more than what was anticipated, I can live with that. But it will not be second rate health care for the people of this portion of our county. It will be as good as it can possibly get. That’s why we’re taking care to build a first-rate, 21st century medical village.”

[/raw] The funding pays for such necessary items as bringing utilities up to seismic codes, replacing structural floor slabs and rebuilding deteriorating sewer pipes—all issues that came to light as workers began renovating the 40-year-old structure.

The board, which approved of the motion brought by Chairman Mark Ridley-Thomas, was approved 4-0.

Dozens Take Part in Health Walk


Gloria Serra, a volunteer at the UMMA Community Clinic in South Los Angeles, is always giving tips to clients seeking health advice. At the top of her list—exercise. So, on a recent Friday, she put on her walking shoes, visor and sunglasses and joined dozens of other volunteers, residents and healthcare providers for a two-mile walk to celebrate health and fitness.

Although the sun’s intense heat pressed down on them, Serra and the other walkers marched on enthusiastically. Serra says she has seen more interest among clients in talking about the connection between obesity and major health problems. They want help.

“A lot of people are asking about healthier things to eat,” she said. “I tell them not to drink soda and instead to drink water.” She says she has also mastered the art of making “green” juice with kale, spinach and cactus paddles as part of her daily vitamin intake and to cleanse her body.

The organized walk, now in its second year, came after the Board of Supervisors approved a motion by Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas that commends the important service of health centers by proclaiming August 11 thru the 17, National Health Center Week in Los Angeles County. Nearly 100 people participated.

The walk, which began at St. John’s Well Child and Family Center on W. 58th Street and ended at Mt. Carmel Park on 70th , was done in a partnership with the Southside Coalition of Community Health Centers, the Empowerment Congress, UMMA Community Clinic, St. John’s Well Child and Family and L.A. Care.

“This walk exemplifies the importance of exercise and fitness,” said Jim Mangia, CEO of St. John’s. “It also creates a sense of stronger and healthier communities.”

Indeed, many of the participants walked with their children in tow or in strollers. Some, like Amelia Amaro, who brought her 4-year-old daughter Janele, thought it was important to set a good example.

“It feels good to walk,” she said as she sipped on a bottle of cold water. “I walk every morning when I take my son to kindergarten.”

Maria Reyes was visiting the park with her children, Adan,3, and Brian, 1, when she saw the event and decided to visit. While she strolled along, receiving information from healthcare providers about healthcare enrollment, emergency preparedness, reproductive health and blood pressure tests, her sons munched on bananas, watermelon slices and grapes.

“This is great,” she said and then looked down with pride at her two boys. “And they have a great appetite.”