Board Approves $20 Million for Diversion

photo

The Board of Supervisors Tuesday voted to set aside $20 million to fund mental health services, substance abuse treatment, job counseling, as well as supportive housing for mentally ill offenders as an alternative to incarceration.

“We know that jail is not the best place to treat the mentally ill and substance abusers,” said Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, who sponsored the motion setting aside the funds. “Jail only makes the mentally ill sicker, and this County has not been able to figure out how to keep them stabilized and healthy in an environment that only makes them worse.”

The mentally ill are jailed at higher rates than others, and those numbers are outpacing the County’s ability to properly treat them. Diversion, or rerouting mentally ill offenders to treatment instead of incarceration, is intended to stabilize them and reduce the likelihood of recidivism. Many of the mentally ill people that wind up in County jails have co-occurring disorders and are homeless.

“Unnecessarily jailing people with mental illness is not only expensive, because they can be treated for a fraction of the cost using community-based programs, but it is also harsh and insensitive, and dare I say, inhumane,” the Supervisor said. “Having an untreated mental illness should not be a crime.”

The County of Los Angeles has been under a Memorandum of Agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice since 2002 and could face a consent decree because the jails were not designed to accommodate or deliver treatment to inmates with severe mental illnesses.

Today, the Board of Supervisors joined with District Attorney Jackie Lacey, County mental and public health departments and the Sheriff’s Department as a financial partner committed to diversion. In 2015, the board will vote on whether to build a $2 billion jail. By setting aside $20 million in a separate fund pending receipt of the District Attorney’s report, the Board has expressed a commitment to righting this wrong.

In the Second Supervisorial District efforts to expand diversion are already underway. The MLK Mental Health Urgent Care Center opened its doors earlier this month on the Martin Luther King Medical Campus. The center is a one-stop shop for families, individuals and law enforcement to bring a person suffering acute distress or an episode related to mental illness. Patients will receive a variety of services including psychiatric evaluation and assessment, crisis intervention, substance abuse counseling and medication support from an on-site team of experts from the county’s departments of mental health, social services, health services and public health.

For more information on the MLK Mental Health Urgent Care Center, please visit:

http://ridley-thomas.lacounty.gov/index.php/mlk-mental-health/

Mental Health Center Coming to MLK Campus

Click to download the event flyer

Click here to RSVP
Join Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, health leaders and the community August 27 for a ribbon cutting celebration for the new Mental Health Urgent Care Center (UCC) at the Martin Luther King Jr. Medical Campus. The Mental Health Center is near the recently opened MLK Outpatient Center and the new hospital, which is scheduled to open next summer.

The new mental health urgent care center, which will open its doors September 4, will operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and will offer a variety of services including psychiatric evaluation and assessment, crisis intervention, medication support and medication management. In addition, individuals and families can receive treatment, alcohol and drug counseling and prevention, domestic violence screening and referrals to other community resources where people can seek help.

Too many people in Los Angeles County are in desperate need of psychiatric services and yet too few places are available to help. Hospital emergency rooms have become ground zero for psychiatric patients in need of help—making it a very expensive way to treat people with psychiatric problems.

The center will be run by Exodus Foundation for Recovery, which has been providing quality behavioral health services to disadvantaged and vulnerable individuals with mental illness, substance use disorders and chronic physical health issues. The organization has developed and established several hospital based inpatient and outpatient programs, a psychiatric and internal medicine provider group and a behavioral health managed care company.

While there is an emphasis on serving the indigent and Medi-Cal patients, no one will be turned away. Anyone over the age of 13 will be accepted but adolescents will be served in a separate space from the adults.

“These are the kinds of services people need to get back on their feet,” said Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas. “I am looking forward to opening this center as well as watching Exodus continue to build strong ties to community centers, faith-based organizations and housing resources to help those in need and at risk.”

Board of Supervisors Anticipates a Strong Diversion Plan for Mentally Ill Inmates

484604297

Los Angeles County has both the largest inmate population of any county in the nation and the largest population of mentally ill people who are incarcerated. While the Board has adopted a $2 billion-jail master plan to demolish Men’s Central Jail, modernize Mira Loma Detention Center for women and construct a new two-tower Correctional Treatment Facility, that plan, however, does not allocate funding to create much-needed alternatives to incarceration for mentally ill inmates.

“Jails are no place for our mentally ill to receive help,” said Supervisor Ridley-Thomas, who called for the county to set aside $20 million to create a robust diversion plan. “We can and we must do more. We have heard from many individuals and experts and they have asked us to improve the outcome for individuals with mental illness as well as save money for the county. A diversion plan is an essential component to making our society better.”

All five board members say they fully support the creation of a strong diversion program that would redirect mentally ill offenders away from county jails, where they currently constitute a substantial portion of the population, to treatment programs. To that end, the Supervisors decided to discuss funding a diversion in September, when District Attorney Jackie Lacey is scheduled to present a plan for Los Angeles County.

Much of the board meeting on Tuesday, July 29, however, was devoted to the testimony of advocates, residents and parents of mentally ill persons calling for the board to act.

As Jo Helen Graham , a mother whose son suffers from mental illness noted in her testimony before the board Tuesday, “Why do we accept jails and prisons as surrogate mental health hospitals for our mentally ill citizens and loved ones rather than build (as the prison industry does) clinics and hospitals to care for the treatment of the mentally ill?”

A strong diversion plan would likely include training for law enforcement and emergency services providers, preventive services for those who may be at risk of getting arrested, offer post-arrest alternatives to incarceration and programs that would help former inmates re-enter society after they are released, such as job training. This plan would work in collaboration with the District Attorney, the courts, law enforcement, mental health, substance abuse and health providers and other key players to make sure it is coordinated and comprehensive.

Lawrence Foy, policy director for A New Way of Life, a nonprofit, noted that funding diversion will put Los Angeles County “on a clear path to providing a comprehensive approach to ameliorating a growing and festering crisis among those faced with mental illness.”

The U.S. Department of Justice recently reported that inadequate supervision and deplorable environmental conditions deprive Los Angeles County jail inmates of constitutionally-required mental health care.

Other cities throughout the country have seen impressive results with their diversion programs, including New York City’s Nathaniel Project with a reported 70 percent reduction in arrests over a two-year period; Chicago’s Thresholds program with an 89 percent reduction in arrests, 86 percent reduction in jail time, and a 76 percent reduction in hospitalization for program participants; and Seattle’s FACT program with a 45 percent reduction in jail and prison bookings.

LETTERS OF SUPPORT

A New Way of Life for Former Inmates

Joseph Baddley, 53, became homeless after being in and out of prison. Not having access to medical care, when Baddley became sick, he hit rock bottom. But thanks to a new program to build more supportive housing in Los Angeles County, Baddley has found an apartment to call home. The 43 units, spread over five formerly blighted and foreclosed properties in South Los Angeles, were specifically created for those who were homeless, veterans in need of housing, former inmates re-entering the community, those living with special needs and those with mental health illnesses.

“Many people helped save my life,” said Baddley. “I love my home and I treat it as a gift,” said Baddley.

Recent ribbon cutting for the the Coalition for Responsible Community Development apartments.

The apartments represent the best of what government, the private sector and community organizations can accomplish when they work together. The project was sponsored by the Coalition for Responsible Community Development and involved a successful collaboration among Los Angeles County, Los Angeles City, the Corporation for Supportive Housing, Restore Neighborhoods Los Angeles, Los Angeles Housing Department, California Housing Finance Agency and Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health among others. The project was completed in August 2013 at a total development cost of $10.5-million. Ten of the 43 units are specifically designed for the visually, physically or mobility impaired.

“CRCD Apartments, with its support from both the City and the County, is a example of permanent supportive housing that works,” said CRCD Executive Director Mark Wilson, noting that residents will be eligible to receive mental health services, regular health care and an array of social services supported with intensive case management.

Former inmate and resident Yolanda Brown. Photo courtesy of CRCD.

For women who have been incarcerated, the apartments offer an especially important place. Many women who are former inmates have trouble finding jobs and housing and end up on the street, where they are often in danger, explained Susan Burton, executive director of A New Way of Life, one of the organizations responsible for the successful re-entry efforts. A New Way of Life supports these residents by providing therapy and legal assistance at court hearings. Many women residents are mothers with children, Burton said. These mothers also receive job training services and assistance with child care.

Resident and former inmate Joseph Baddley tears up while welcoming Supervisor Ridley-Thomas into his new home.

At the recent grand opening of the apartments, Baddley invited a few guests into his home including A New Way of Life Executive Director Susan Burton and Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas.

“He invited us into his home, held back his tears best he could and told us his story,” said Supervisor Ridley-Thomas. “This is the face of reentry.”

Supporting affordable housing has been a focus for the Supervisor since taking office in 2008. Since 2009, the Supervisor has helped to create 1,100 units in the second district representing a total public/private investment of more than $350-million. And 295 additional units are now under construction representing an additional $121-million.

During his public remarks at the grand opening, Supervisor Ridley-Thomas focused on the economic benefits of supportive housing to the county. He noted that building housing costs far less than incarceration.

“Many talk about redemption, recovery and reentry,” said Supervisor Ridley-Thomas. “The Coalition for Responsible Community Development is doing it.”

 

St. John’s Well Child Opens New Health Center Campus in South LA

St. John’s Well Child Chief Executive Jim Mangia and Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas

It used to take Veronica Calbio 30 minutes by bus to get her children, Genesis, 2, and Abraham, 5, for a checkup at the nearest clinic in South Los Angeles. But with the recent opening of a new health center at St. John’s Well Child and Family Center on West 58th Street, a doctor’s visit is now only 10 minutes away from her home.

“It is so much better,” she said, sitting with her children in the waiting room of the Dr. Louis C. Frayser Health Center, “because I don’t have a car I can take the bus and be here faster for the kids’ check-ups and for the dentist. This is a good clinic.”

On the fourth anniversary of President Obama’s signing of the Affordable Care Act, St. John’s celebrated the grand opening of the S. Mark Taper Foundation Health and Wellness Campus, which includes the Frayser Health Center for children and mothers, and the S. Mark Taper Foundation Health and Wellness Center for adults. The campus, located between Vermont Avenue and Hoover Street, will provide additional services for more than 30,000 patients in some of South Los Angeles’ poorest communities.

The campus is a model of modern day health care delivery that brings the best available resources close to neighborhoods in need. South Los Angeles has among the highest rates of chronic diseases in California and hundreds of thousands of its residents are uninsured; more than a third live in poverty, and health officials estimate that 16 percent of children in South Los Angeles have never been to a dentist, leading to a slew of health issues that manifest as they grow into adults. The impact of Obamacare on this population will be profound: so far, 5.3 million people have enrolled in the Affordable Care Act and with a March 31 deadline looming, it is hoped that more take advantage of it.

“Thousands of newly-insured patients will need healthcare, and thanks to Obamacare we have two beautiful, newly-constructed health centers in the heart of South Los Angeles to provide quality care,” said St. John’s President and CEO Jim Mangia. “This is a promise fulfilled by President Obama.”

President Obama’s senior advisor, Valerie Jarrett, attended Monday’s opening and declared it a great example of federal, local elected officials, residents, business leaders and foundations collaborating to accomplish something great. St. Johns Valerie 1

“This day shows what we can accomplish when we work together,” she said.

With $9.4 million allotted, St. John’s is the largest recipient of capital funding from the Affordable Care Act in Los Angeles County. The funding, supplemented by major contributors including First 5 and the Ahmanson Foundation, helped fund the construction of 26 new exam rooms, medical and dental services for pediatric patients as well as pre-natal care, expanded services for adults, chronic disease care, a full-scope pharmacy and behavioral health services. The wellness campus houses full-scope diagnostic services including x-ray, mammography and ultra-sound services.

For Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, a longtime supporter of St. John’s, the center brings a high level of service to a community in need.

“St. John’s just keeps moving forward to give people in this community a better quality of life,” he said. “This is a matter of justice. Healthcare is a right, not a privilege.”

Formerly Homeless Find Affordable Housing

For seven years, Irvin Dixon, 59, had been homeless in Los Angeles County.  He slept on public benches and waited in long lines for free meals.  Sal Tovar, 52, had spent nine years homeless.  He remembers taking “bird baths” in the park to stay clean.  But thanks to a collaboration among the city, county and several community groups, 56 new units that rent for about $50 a month are home to nearly 100 other residents such as Dixon and Tovar.

Addressing an audience assembled recently to mark the opening of the South Los Angeles Supportive Housing Program,  Yolanda Vera, deputy for healthcare services for Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, said: “This is an example of blight made right.”

The Department of Health Services Neighborhood Stabilization Project Housing development consists of 15 formerly-blighted properties.  The properties were purchased and remodeled by the City of Los Angeles Housing Department and Restore Neighborhoods Los Angeles and are now operated by the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services.  The project is a collaborative partnership among the city, the county, United Way of Greater Los Angeles, Home for Good and the Hilton Foundation.

The new housing is aimed to help those homeless individuals who are most in need and high users of county health resources.

“Providing housing is actually money-saving for the health system,” said Dr. Mitchell Katz, Director for the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services.  According to Dr. Katz, housing one homeless person costs between $600 to $900 per month whereas hospital time can cost $3,300 per day.  The health services department estimates that the annual cost for inpatient services for homeless patients is roughly $70 million or $30,000 per patient.

The comprehensive project includes mental health services and substance abuse treatment.  Over $12 million in newly renovated housing units were provided by the City of Los Angeles Housing and Community Investment Department.  $5.4 million in rental subsidies over 10 years was provided by the Housing Authority of the city of Los Angeles.  $7.2 million over 10 years in health services was provided by the Los Angeles County Departments of Health Services, Mental Health and Public Health.

According to Supervisor Ridley-Thomas, “These new units are just the beginning of a revolutionary approach to heal through housing.”

Tovar does not forget his own recent struggles: Once a month he loads a suitcase full of cakes, bread and tortillas and takes it to a food bank to help feed less fortunate homeless people.  He feels compelled to “pay it forward.” Tovar said, “It makes me feel good because I’m able to help them out.”

Can Housing L.A. County’s Homeless Families Save Money?


In Los Angeles County, 7,391 families struggle nightly to find a way to survive without shelter. In 2010, several agencies began to develop a regional approach to providing not just housing, but supportive services and need-based assistance to better help homeless families regain stability. In some cases, mental health and substance abuse services, or housing assistance made the difference.

The Family Solutions Centers started last March with $3.7 million in city and county funding, with the goal of rapidly rehousing homeless households and offering centers throughout Los Angeles County where homeless can go to have problems professionally assessed. To date, there are seven lead agencies that host Family Solution Centers in six of the eight service planning areas in Los Angeles County. These Family Solutions can direct families to health services, employment assistance services, rental assistance or emergency housing. And the program has already proven to be successful, having seen 1,542 families between March and December. Three hundred and two of those families were able to avoid homelessness, 305 were placed in interim housing, and 417 were provided permanent housing.

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors approved an additional $10.2 million to set up more Family Solution Centers to offer more services. An additional $2.4 million is also being considered for mental health services. The centers will extend to at least eight agencies and promises to service all eight service planning areas in Los Angeles County. The services will be expanded to include social service case managers and substance abuse treatment. The expanded program will promote collaboration between public agencies and homeless service providers and be called the Homeless Family Solutions System. The system also includes the collection of data to assess which programs are working and to track long term success with families.

“Families are the core of our community,” said Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas. “And today we have the opportunity to improve the way we deliver services to those families most in need.”

Christine Mirasy-Glasco, executive director of Upward Bound House, a community-based social service agency, testified before Board of Supervisors Tuesday in support of expanding Family Solutions Centers. The centers, she said, have streamlined the process of getting help for families. “Families used to have to travel around the entire county every day looking for services,” Mirasy-Glasco said. “This changes all of that.”

A study by the University of Pennsylvania found that 85 percent of homeless people in Philadelphia who were given housing and support were still in housing two years later and were unlikely to become homeless again.
Research shows that people spend less time in expensive emergency rooms and hospital beds when they have housing. Children are able to attend school and do homework when they have a warm home, a bed to sleep in and a sturdy table to write on.

“It is a proven program. It works. And it’s been evaluated,” said Los Angeles County Supervisor Gloria Molina.

Supervisor Ridley-Thomas added, “Without question, supporting homeless families with services and housing saves money in the long run. It simply costs less to serve and house than it does to ignore. It’s an investment in our future.”

Click here for more information about Family Service Centers.

Star Apartments Open New Clinic

The Star Apartment project, a newly built supportive housing site for the homeless, also will be home to a new Department of Health Services primary care clinic that will specialize in providing integrated health care services to homeless people and residents of supportive housing.

The building, owned by the Skid Row Housing Trust, will house the Star Clinic on the ground level and the department’s Housing for Health offices, with 102 residential units above. Funding for the clinic was recently approved by the Board of Supervisors.

Seventy-Eight tenants already have moved into the building, located on 6th Street and Maple Avenue, with the rest scheduled to move in by the end of December. Designed by notable architect Michael Maltzan, the building is made of prefabricated residences that were placed on top of a concrete superstructure. Formerly an elevated parking garage, the building will include a basketball court and track on its former roof for the tenants. The UniHealth Foundation, Conrad N. Hilton Foundation and Gensler Architecture also contributed to the project.

Based on other similar projects, the Department of Health Services anticipates a 75 percent reduction in unnecessary emergency room visits and inpatient admissions for tenants who are housed in the the Star apartments.

Located along the border of Skid Row, the project has been praised by architecture and urban design experts for setting a new standard for remodeling an existing 1-story building and adding new community spaces and residential levels above. In addition, there will be a community garden in the space for residents to enjoy.

“The Star Apartments will offer high quality housing, services and amenities to help folks get back on their feet and live productive lives,” said Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, whose office contributed $400,000 for the project. “It is essential that we offer these types of homes for people in need across our community.”

Psychiatric Care Coming to MLK Medical Campus

[raw]
Nearly one in four adults—or 57.7 million Americans—have a mental health disorder and need help. In Los Angeles, in desperate need of psychiatric services, yet there are too few available resources and outlets for treatment. Hospital emergency rooms have become ground zero for psychiatric patients in need of help—providing only temporary intervention at great expense.

Recently, community leaders and healthcare providers gathered to discuss plans for the Martin Luther King Jr. Psychiatric Urgent Care Center, a new facility that is expected to open next spring. The center will provide prompt, quality and culturally sensitive care to both adults and teens.

The center, which will be on the Martin Luther King Jr. Medical Campus where the new Hospital and Outpatient Center will open, will offer psychiatric evaluation and assessment, crisis intervention, medication support and medication management. Also available will be individual and family treatment, alcohol and drug counseling and prevention, domestic violence screening and referrals to other community resources where people can seek help.[/raw]

The center will be run by Exodus Recovery, Inc., which has been providing psychiatric and chemical dependency treatment services in Southern California since 1989. The organization has developed and established several hospital-based inpatient and outpatient programs, a psychiatric and internal medicine provider group and a behavioral health managed care company.

The care received will be immediate and comprehensive including appropriate discharge within 24 hours to services spanning the entire spectrum of mental health treatment within the community,” said Luana Murphy, Chief Executive of Exodus Recovery, Inc. “This results in a significant decrease in the number of clients requiring hospitalizations, freeing up inpatient resources for those most in need.”

Although there is an emphasis on serving the indigent and Medi-Cal patients, no one will be turned away. Anyone over the age of 13 will be accepted, however, adolescents who are admitted will be housed upstairs and adults downstairs.

The approach to helping patients will be all encompassing, with psychologists, social workers, nurses, case workers and housing specialists on hand to help people get back on their feet. In addition, the center is expected to have strong ties to community centers, faith-based organizations and housing resources to continue offering services to those in need.

“Young people often react positively from the immediate attention and services provided in a more calming environment than can be found in a busy Emergency Department,” added Murphy. “They interact not only with professionals but will also be in the company of other adolescents with whom they can relate.”

School Based Health Clinics Deliver Holistic Care

School-based clinics are the wave of the future for wellness and prevention services. To that end, creating and expanding school based health centers has been a priority for Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas for the past decade. As a state legislator, he authored several bills in support of school based health centers, and he has continued that work with many partners, including the Los Angeles Unified School District, St. John’s Well Child & Family Center and other private and nonprofit entities, collaborating to build 12 new school-based health centers in the Second District. At these centers, students and their families are offered both physical and mental health services in one place — providing easy access to care close to where people live, work and study. Considering that thousands of students have limited, inadequate or no regular access to preventative health care, the school-based health center model is set to profoundly impact the way healthcare is delivered.

FACT BOX

What is a school-based health center?

A school-based health center is a medical clinic located on a school campus. It provides comprehensive preventive primary and mental health services to students. Many are also open to the community. Most school-based health centers in the Second District are operated by private health care clinics that get some funding fromLos AngelesCounty’s Department of Health Services to help them serve patients without insurance.

Why locate a health center on a school campus?

The goal is to make healthcare easily accessible to young people and their families, as well as to the wider community. Studies have shown that students who receive good health care do better in school and are more likely to graduate. Also, many families feel more comfortable getting health care in familiar and trusted settings, like schools.

Are school-based health centers open to the community?

Yes. Many centers even have separate entrances – one facing the school for students and one facing the street for the community. These centers can serve as a medical home for the entire family because they are close, convenient and affordable.

What type of services do school-based health centers provide?

It varies site by site. Most school-based health centers provide a range of health care services, including physical examinations, mental health services, dental care, health education, family planning and substance abuse counseling.

How many school-based health centers are there in the County of Los Angeles?

There are 60 school-based health centers and four mobile vans that provide health services throughoutLos AngelesCounty. There are 24 in the Second District and eight new ones that will open by January of 2013. More information about the new SBHCs, including contact information, can be found in the site profile portion of this page.

How much do school-based health center health care services cost?

Cost is based on each patient’s ability to pay. Many school-based health centers will help patients enroll in free and low cost State and County health care programs, if they are eligible

Are centers cost effective?

Yes. School-based health centers significantly reduce costly and inappropriate emergency room use.

How do I access services at a school based health centers?

Walk-in hours as well as scheduled appointments are available. Please click through the site profiles in order to find the center closest to you.


Wellness Center at Manual Arts High School


4085 S. Vermont Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90037 http://goo.gl/maps/kabhJ
Appointment Line (323) 541-1631 Englishx1 Spanishx9

Hours of Operation

MF 8:30 am – 4 pm
Sat 7 am – 2:30 pm
Summer hours may vary

Wellness Center Providers

St. John’s Well Child & Family Center

LAUSD School Mental Health
LA Child Guidance Center

LAC Probation Department

Services Offered On-Site

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition
  • Health insurance enrollment

Wellness Center at Washington Preparatory High School

1555 West 110th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90047 http://goo.gl/maps/BQ5A3
Appointment Line (323) 541-1631 Englishx1 Spanishx9

Hours of Operation
T-Th 8:30 am – 5 pm
Summer hours may vary

Wellness Providers:

St. John’s Well Child & Family Center

LAUSD School Mental Health

Special Service for Groups

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Dental
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition
  • Health insurance enrollment

Wellness Center at Carson High School


270 East 223rd Street
Carson, CA 90745 http://goo.gl/maps/dOXeY

Appointment Line (310) 802-6170

Hours of Operation:
M W F 7:30 am – 4:30 pm (7:30-12pm every other Friday Summer hours may vary)

Wellness Center Providers:

South Bay Family Health Care Center

LAUSD School Mental Health

Children’s Bureau

Children’s Institute

Masada Homes

Harbor Area Substance Abuse Treatment Center

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Dental
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV Testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s Health
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition
  • Health insurance enrollment
  • Health Education

Wellness Center at Jefferson High School

Open Date October 18, 2012 (GO same date)
3410 S. Hooper Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90011 http://goo.gl/maps/Zoiqb

Appointment Line: (323) 908-4200

Hours of Operation
MWF 8 am – 3:30 pm
Summer hours may vary

Wellness Center Providers

South Central Family Health Center

LAUSD School Mental Health

Services Offered On-Site

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Dental
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition
  • Health insurance enrollment/li>
  • Health education
  • Crisis intervention

Wellness Center at Fremont High School


7821 S. Avalon Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90003 http://goo.gl/maps/MfNyz
Appointment Line (323) 404-9270

Hours of Operation
M 8:30 am – 12:00 pm
T , TH 8:30 am – 5 pm

Wellness Center Providers:

UMMA Clinic
Special Service for Groups

LAUSD Mental Health
LA Land Trust
Integrated School Health (LAC: DCFS, DHS, DMH, DPS and Probation)

Services Offered On-Site

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition
  • Health insurance enrollment
  • Health education

Wellness Center at Dominguez High School


15301 S. San Jose
Compton, CA 90221 http://goo.gl/maps/vt73o
Appointment Line (562) 630-6825 (Englishx1, Spanishx9)

Hours of Operation
MTWThF 8:30 am – 5 pm
Sat 7 am – 3 pm
Summer hours may vary

Wellness Center Providers:

St. John’s Well Child & Family Center
SHIELDS for Families

Services Offered On-Site

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Dental
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition
  • Health insurance enrollment
  • Health education

Jordan High School

10110 South Juniper Street
Los Angeles, CA 90002 http://goo.gl/maps/mkmkP

Appointment Line: (323) 488-5915

Hours of Operation:
T Th 7:30 am – 4:30 pm
F 1 – 5 pm

Wellness Providers:
Watts Healthcare Corporation
LAUSD School Mental Health

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Immunizations
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • Vision and hearing
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition

 

Hyde Park Elementary School

6505 8th Avenue
Bungalow 46
Los Angeles, CA 90043 http://goo.gl/maps/9KuVD
Appointment Line: (323) 750-9232

Hours of Operation:
M W TH F 8:30 am – 5 pm
T 8:30 am – 6:30 pm
Sat 7 am – 3:30 pm
Dental only available on Thursdays

Wellness Providers:
St. John’s Well Child & Family Center

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Prenatal care
  • Reproductive health
  • Nutrition
  • Health insurance enrollment
  • Dental services

 

Dorsey High School Mobile Clinic (students only)

3537 Farmdale Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90016 http://goo.gl/maps/9vaGt

Appointment Line: (323) 730-1920

Hours of Operation:
M 8:30 am – 10:30 am

Wellness Providers:
To Help Everyone Clinic (T.H.E. Clinic)

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Prenatal care
  • Reproductive health
  • Nutrition

 

Crenshaw High School Mobile Clinic (students only)

5010 11th Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90043 http://goo.gl/maps/ozmgg

Appointment Line: (323) 730-1920

Hours of Operation:
F 8:30 am – 10:30 am

Wellness Providers:
To Help Everyone Clinic (T.H.E. Clinic)

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Prenatal care
  • Reproductive health
  • Nutrition

 

Holmes Avenue Elementary School (Students Only)

5108 Holmes Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90058 http://goo.gl/maps/SxeuM

Appointment Line: (323) 587-3638

Hours of Operation:
MTWThF 8 am – 2:30 pm
Days and hours may vary by school calendar.

Wellness Providers:
LAUSD

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Immunizations
  • Physical exams

 

Los Angeles High School (Students Only)

4650 W. Olympic Boulevard
Los Angeles, California 90019 http://goo.gl/maps/4QMlC

Appointment Line: (213) 747-5542

Hours of Operation:
TTh 7:30 am – 4 pm

Wellness Providers:
Eisner Pediatric & Family Medical Center

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Prenatal care
  • Reproductive health

Foshay Learning Center

3751 S Harvard Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90018 http://bit.ly/1ccwdMJ

Appointment Line: (323) 373-9400

Hours of Operation:
MTWThF 8 am – 5 pm

 

Wellness Providers:
Northeast Community Clinic

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Family planning
  • Birth control
  • Health and nutrition education

Gardena High School (Students Only)

1301 West 182nd Street
Gardena, CA 90248 http://goo.gl/maps/oyrH8

Appointment Line: (310) 808-1180

Hours of Operation
MWThF 8 am – 4 pm

Wellness Providers:
Los Angeles County DHS
LAUSD

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Family planning
  • Birth control
  • Health and nutrition education
  • Mental health (Thursday & Friday)
  • Peer health educators

S. Mark Taper Health Clinic at The Accelerated School                                                     

4000 S. Main Street
Los Angeles, CA 90037 http://goo.gl/maps/2Vjw1

Appointment Line: (323) 908-4242

Hours of Operation:
M T W TH F 8 am – 4:30 pm

Wellness Providers:
South Central Family Health Center

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Preventive Health Screenings
  • School Sports Physicals
  • Health Counseling and Education
  • Routine Scheduled Immunizations for Children
  • Routine and Comprehensive Checkups for Children, Youth, and Adults

Lennox School District

10223 Firmona Ave
Lennox, California 90304 http://goo.gl/maps/E8Nhx

Appointment Line: (310) 695-4017

Hours of Operation:
M W 8 am – 5 pm
TH  1 pm – 5 pm

Wellness Providers:
To Help Everyone Clinic (T.H.E. Clinic)

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Prenatal care
  • Reproductive health
  • Nutrition
  • Dental Services coming soon

Culver City High School

4401 Elenda Street

Culver City, CA 90230 http://goo.gl/maps/o0WL

Appointment Line: (310) 842 – 4328

Hours of Operation:
Medical Services
M 8 am – 12 pm
W 8 am – 12 pm

Mental Health Services
MThF 8 am – 3 pm
W 8 am – 12 pm

Wellness Providers:
Venice Family Clinic

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Immunizations
  • Prescriptions
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • STD/HIV testing
  • Vision and hearing
  • Women’s health
  • Prenatal care
  • Reproductive health
  • Nutrition

Locke High School

316 East 111st Street
Los Angeles, CA 90061 http://goo.gl/maps/MkQEw

Appointment Line: (323) 450-2376

 

Hours of Operation:
M W 7:30 am – 4:30 pm
F 7:30  – 11:30 am

Wellness Providers:
Watts Healthcare Corporation
LAUSD Mental Health
SHIELDS for Families (Mental Health)
Green Dot

Services Offered On-Site:

  • Primary care and treatment
  • Mental health
  • Immunizations
  • Lab services
  • Physical exams
  • Vision and hearing
  • Reproductive health
  • Prenatal care
  • Nutrition